At some point or another while on holiday, we all get that itch to send a Snapchat or message the WhatsApp group. As long as there's wi-fi available, you're sorted - but once you stray too far from the hotel's router, you dip into your data, only to find that your provider has charged you twice the cost of the holiday for using it.

Arron Coles managed to suffer this exact fate - but not because of a quick Facebook update. Instead, he simply made a grave mistake.

During a trip to Egypt, the 32-year-old thought his phone had been linked up to his hotel's wi-fi, but it was actually switched to data roaming, the Mirror reports. After 10 days overseas with it switched on, he received a £2,682 ($3,544) phone bill.

via GIPHY

BT, his network, only text to tell him to call them, to prevent him being disconnected. Arron rang and complained that they should have limited his roaming.

He also threatened to involve the Financial Ombudsman, forcing BT to offer a reduced bill of £1,042 ($1,377), which is still huge.

Credit: SWNS

"I had a really, really nice holiday with my partner and her family, but it has soured it to be honest," he said.

"I'm willing to be honest and admit it was a mistake to just put my phone to one side - and not check the mobile data was on - but I feel like they have seen it as an opportunity to make money.

"I put the phone to one side and it must have disconnected from wi-fi. There must have been apps running in the background.

"They did not make any attempt to contact me or my work to tell them of the severity of the bill.

"I got one text - which I have since found out was sent when the bill was at £600 ($793) - asking me to get in touch to ensure my phone could still be used.

"There was no suggestion or hint that the bill had become so large.

"Why didn't they block it? Surely there is nobody who would want to come back to that kind of bill."

After his session on the hotel wi-fi expired, his phone automatically switched to data roaming, updating apps and running background refresh and so on.

His phone is supplied by his work, so he was questioned by HR staff about his extra charges, saying that he must reimburse them in full.

He's said he'll have to take out a loan to pay off the hefty debt.

Credit: PA

A spokesman for BT said: "The roaming charges that Mr Coles has been charged are from his time in Egypt between the 14 and 23 August.

"When Mr Coles arrived in Egypt we sent him a text message to make him aware of the £4 ($5.29) per MB charge.

"We sent this directly to his mobile and not to his company. On the same date however we also tried to call the company. As a goodwill gesture we've offered to reduce Mr Coles' bill by 50 percent.

"We're always disappointed when we cannot come to an agreement with a customer, but we follow the Ofcom process carefully to ensure the customer can refer the matter to the Telecommunication Ombudsman and we always abide by their conclusions."

Be aware of this - you're better off just leaving your phone untouched.

Featured Image Credit: SWNS

Mark McGowan

Mark is a journalist at LADbible, who joined in 2015 after a year as a freelance writer. In the past he blogged for independent football fan channel Redmen TV, after graduating from Staffordshire University with degrees in journalism and English literature. He has worked on campaigns such as UOKM8? and IIOC.

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