David Meade was the man behind the most recent apocalypse theory that a planet was going to smash into us and destroy all life on Earth on September 23. The only problem with his theory was that it didn't happen.

But he's insisting that Planet X or Niburu is still planning on causing havoc for us, just in a different way. The doomsday theorist says that from October 15, seven years of horrific climatic events like tsunamis, earthquakes and hurricanes will batter the earth.

Meade points to the recent devastating earthquake which rocked Mexico, along with Hurricane Harvey, Irma and Maria as signs that the 'seven-year tribulation' is about to kick off.

He said: "It's the beginning. Ever since the Great American Solar Eclipse of August 21 we have been hit by a continued series of judgements."

Earthquake image

Credit: Creative Commons

The conspiracy theorist was getting these predictions from Bible verses, including one from Luke 21: 25 to 26, which says: "There will be signs in the sun, moon and stars. On the earth, nations will be in anguish and perplexity at the roaring and tossing of the sea.

"People will faint from terror, apprehensive of what is coming on the world, for the heavenly bodies will be shaken."

But apparently, not only will we be hit by climatic events, but there will also be 'nuclear exchanges between the US, Britain and our enemies - Russia, China, Iran and North Korea'.

via GIPHY

Not only that, but an asteroid called Wormwood, which follows Planet X around the solar system, will hit Earth and do more damage. Meade adds: "It will involve cataclysmic climate events related to Planet X or Wormwood - those are the trumpet judgements of Revelation."

While the ramblings of a human wouldn't normally rouse an authority on the cosmos, but NASA felt the need to dispel Meade's predictions.

In a statement, it said: "The planet in question, Nibiru, doesn't exist, so there will be no collision. The story of Nibiru has been around for years... and is periodically recycled into new apocalyptic fables.

"Nibiru and other stories about wayward planets are an internet hoax. There is no factual basis for these claims. If Nibiru or Planet X were real and headed for an encounter with the Earth... astronomers would have been tracking it for at least the past decade, and it would be visible by now to the naked eye. Obviously, it does not exist."

But that's exactly what they want us to think. Wake up sheeple!

Sources: Mirror, Telegraph

Featured Image Credit: Creative Commons

Stewart Perrie

Stewart Perrie is a Trending Journalist at LADbible. His first job was as a newsreader and journalist at the award winning Sydney radio station, Macquarie Radio. He was solely responsible for the content broadcast on multiple stations across Australia when the MH17, Germanwings and AirAsia disasters unfolded. Stewart has covered the conflict in Syria for LADbible, interviewing a doctor on the front line, and has contributed to the hugely successful UOKM8 campaign.

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