Black Panther Causes Spike in Popularity Of Black Cats

Anyone who's seen Black Panther will remember the awesome fights between Chadwick Boseman and Michael B. Jordan, the witty put-downs of Letitia Wright and Martin Freeman playing an every-man kind of man that only he can do so very well - albeit this time he's a CIA agent with an American accent.

The film has been a critical and commercial smash, earning $400m in ten days, the third-fastest grossing film of all time.

It's also had a somewhat unexpected effect on pet adoptions, with a huge spike in the number of people going out to get themselves a black kitty cat.

A Tumblr user took to her account to note a recent upswing in the number of black cats being adopted at her local shelter.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

The blogger wrote: "Unexpected Benefit of Black Panther: my local pet shelters went from having something like 50-60 black cats between them to having NONE, because they've all been adopted out and named after the characters. T'challa is the most popular, but there are a fair number of Okoyes and Shuris as well.

"And one very confused elderly Humane Society volunteer wondering why someone would name such a sweet cat Killmonger."

Presumably, the rise in the number of black cats being adopted is due to a shortage/illegalness of adopting actual black panthers, which take up more room and tend to get quite bitey.

They're also absolute gannets when it comes to feeding time, and could probably manage a small child, not good for healthy neighbourly relations.

The news is a boost for the black cats of the world, which are often shunned by suspicious pet owners.

Black cats are viewed in different lights depending on which part of the world you're in.

Various western cultures view them as bad luck as they were believed to be shape-shifting witches, though in some parts of Britain and Scotland the appearance of a black cat was viewed as good luck, while pirates saw them as good luck if they walked towards you, bad if it was away. Bonkers.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

The Pilgrims were so superstitious of black cats (like everything else, they thought it was Satan) that anyone owning one should be punished or even killed.

Shelters often report lower adoption numbers of black cats, particularly in the US, due to superstitions attached to them.

However, one UK black cat shelter owner (cool passport job title) told The Telegraph earlier this year that they'd become less popular due to their unsuitably in selfies.

Christine Bayka, who runs The Moggery rehoming centre in Bristol, told the paper that 'black cats don't show up in selfies' and that it had become more difficult to re-home black cats since selfies became popular.

It goes without saying that Christine will be absolutely thrilled at the release of Black Panther, not least because of her love of high-octane cinematic action.

Featured Image Credit: Matt Kennedy/Marvel

Ronan O'Shea

Ronan J O'Shea is a freelance journalist from London who has written for titles including LADbible, Headspace, The Independent, National Geographic Traveller and New York Post. Contact him at [email protected]

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