It's hard to tell just how far away Charlie Brooker's fucked-up dystopian future might be.

Some Black Mirror episodes make you think it's set in the present day, like 'The National Anthem' (the pig fucking one) or 'Shut Up and Dance' (the young paedophile hacking one).

Whereas others, such as 'San Junipero' (the only nice one) or 'Fifteen Million Merits' (the bike pedalling one) seem to take place many years into the distant future.

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But that hasn't stopped fans from asking Brooker whether the episodes are interconnected or individually exist in self-contained universes. Well, if you happened to be paying very close attention to every episode, you might spot some of the Easter eggs in the latest season.

In 'Arkangel', a woman shows one mum how a digital implant in her daughter's head can allow her to see what the youngster is seeing. When the toddler is shown distressing images, a parental filter comes on and censors whatever is in front of them.

What scene does the woman put on as a definition of 'distressing images'? Well, none other than a moment in BM episode 'Men Against Fire' where a soldier sprays a load of bullets at roaches.

When the mum is given a tablet, the device which allows her to control what her daughter sees, it also looks eerily like the one from 'The Entire History of You'.

There's a sly connection between episode four, 'Hang the DJ' and episode one of season four, 'USS Callister', when we see people use the same dating app.

'Crocodile' features a hotel on-demand video service showing 'Best Of Wraith Babes', which is a nice little throwback to the porn channel seen on 'Fifteen Million Merits'.

That wasn't the only reference to that episode from season one, as later in 'Crocodile', Irma Thomas' song 'Anyone Who Knows What Love Is' is playing, which was the same track that character Abi sang during 'Hot Shot'.

It also appears in 'White Christmas' and 'Men Against Fire'.

But 'Black Museum' is possibly the episode that includes the most amount of references to other chapters. There are relics from 'White Bear', 'Arkangel', 'USS Callister', 'Crocodile' and 'Hated in the Nation'.

There's also nod to 'San Junipero' when a character talks about people being 'uploaded' to the cloud, which also could be a reference to 'USS Callister' as well.

Charlie Brooker has alluded to how he crafts his stories, telling Thrillist: "I've read a couple things where people have tried to work out whether this whole thing is set in one coherent universe, and my view is, if they want to believe that, that's fine.

"But I don't approach it that way, any more than The Twilight Zone was set in one coherent universe. It's probably all in the same psychological universe."

So 'no it isn't', pretty much. But also kind of 'yes it is'.

Hope that clears everything up for you.

Featured Image Credit: Netflix

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