M. Night Shyamalan Used His Own Money To Fund 'Glass' Movie

It's safe to say that director M. Night Shyamalan divides opinion - some love his movies, other can't stand them.

His breakthrough movie The Sixth Sense was a global hit, leaving audiences confused and terrified in equal measure. But in recent years, flops like The Last Airbender and After Earth made a less dramatic impression on audiences.

And according to reports, a series of career missteps meant the man with the Midas touch was left to fund three films with his own money.

This year sees him release Glass, the final film in the Eastrail 177 trilogy, following on from Unbreakable and psychological thriller Split.

Forbes claims the 48-year-old had to use the money he made from two previous films, as well as collateral from his home, to scrape together the $20 million needed to get the movie produced.

Over the past few years the director has enjoyed something of renaissance, with 2015 horror The Visit and 2016 thriller Spit raking in millions at the box office, but also - perhaps more importantly for Shyamalan - receiving critical acclaim as well.

Willis and Shyamalan on set of the finale to the 'Eastrail 177' trilogy, 'Glass'. Credit: Glass Movie International/Twitter
Willis and Shyamalan on set of the finale to the 'Eastrail 177' trilogy, 'Glass'. Credit: Glass Movie International/Twitter

Yet these were even more difficult to get made. The financial magazine says in order for The Visit to see the light of day, he had to take out a $5m loan on his 125-acre Pennsylvania estate.

And straight after this he then had to pull together $9m of his own money to get Split off the ground. Which is an impressive bit of determination on his part.

However, early signals suggest his most recent offering isn't going down too well with critics.

The film sees three of Shyamalan's most iconic characters, Mr Glass (Samuel L Jackson) David Dunn (Bruce Willis) and the Beast (James McAvoy) living in the same asylum.

The film's synopsis says: "Following the conclusion of Split, Glass finds Dunn pursuing Crumb's superhuman figure of The Beast in a series of escalating encounters, while the shadowy presence of Price emerges as an orchestrator who holds secrets critical to both men."

M. Night Shyamalan had to pay his last three movies himself. Credit: Glass Movie International/YouTube
M. Night Shyamalan had to pay his last three movies himself. Credit: Glass Movie International/YouTube

Speaking to Digital Spy, McAvoy said the role of the Beast was one of the hardest he has had to play.

He said: "The Beast is just a beast, really. He has to be a bit different, a bit alien. He can't just be a supervillain who wants to do something bad and has a certain skillset to go about doing that. He's animalistic and he's not unintelligent, but he's limited, and when we made him normal, it wasn't working.

"You have to egg over into maybe flirting with bad acting or overacting to give this sort of alien, animal type performance. He was tricky because you're constantly going, 'Is this too much? Is this rotten?'

"I'm sure there will be people out there going, 'Yes, Mr McAvoy, it was rotten and it was too much,' but hopefully there will be people who go, 'You tread the line fine.'"

Featured Image Credit: PA

Dominic Smithers

After graduating from Leeds University with a degree in French and History, Dom went onto gain an NCTJ journalism qualification. Since then he has worked as a reporter at the Manchester Evening News and the Macclesfield Express, covering breaking news, court, sports, and politics.

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