You can always rely on the BBC for a great nature documentary these days. In recent years we've been blessed with the long-awaited sequels to Planet Earth and, currently, Blue Planet.

Credit: BBC / Blue Planet II

Now the public service broadcaster has announced a huge raft of new nature-related content, including a huge new BBC One documentary hosted by the granddaddy of nature broadcasting himself, Sir David Attenborough.

The one-hour documentary, Walking Giants, will show Sir David exploring one of the 'dinosaur finds of the century' - 200 bones from seven creatures, including the bones of the largest animal believed to have ever walked on Earth.

Tony Hall, Director General of the BBC, said: "No-one does natural history like the BBC. We've got the best back catalogue in the world and an exciting future ahead of us.

Credit: PA

"Today I'm delighted to announce what I think is the most ambitious range of Natural History we've ever commissioned - with Sir David Attenborough going on some big new adventures for us."

Walking Giants, which has been described as a 'pre-historic detective story', will show scientists scrambling to unearth the bones of the biggest beast in the South American desert.

Meanwhile, Sir David will link together clues from the bones with living animals like elephants and giraffes to figure out how and why exactly dinosaurs turned out to be so big. Sounds fascinating.

Along with Walking Giants, we'll also get to see Sir David in action into two slightly lower-key bird documentaries on BBC Two.

In Attenborough's Birds of Paradise, Sir David will travel to New Guinea, Indonesia and Qatar to uncover the story of how 'birds from paradise' have captivated explorers and royals for centuries.

Meanwhile, Attenborough's Biggest Birds (oo-er) will focus on enormous flightless birds across the world, centring on a family of breeding ostriches struggling to survive in Africa's Kalahari desert

In case three new Attenborough films isn't enough for us, the Beeb has announced a ton of other new programmes to keep us occupied in 2018, including the 'epic new BBC1 landmark Dynasty' - presumably not a reboot of the 1980s soap.

According to the BBC, these new programmes will use 'innovative new filming techniques' from the latest camera technology to reveal life across the planet from Ireland to Death Valley.

Blue Planet 2

Credit: BBC / Blue Planet 2

Today the BBC even launched BBC Earth, the new digital home for the broadcaster's nature content in the UK.

Together with news and in-depth features on natural phenomena, BBC Earth will also focus on British wildlife, giving visitors a calendar of natural events, science guides and activities to take part in.

We might underestimate them at times, but we're bloody lucky to have the Beeb, and Sir David. Let's hope we get to hear his soothing voice narrating the fascinating escapades of our animal mates for many years to come.

Featured Image Credit: PA Images

Chris Ogden

Chris Ogden is a journalist at LADbible. He graduated from the University of East Anglia with degrees in English Literature and Creative Writing before completing his NCTJ Diploma in Multimedia Journalism. Chris has previously written for the independent culture magazine The Skinny, among other publications.

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