What's more infuriating than waiting in all day for a parcel, then nipping out for two minutes only for it to arrive then?

Well, being charged £45 and not even getting your parcel certainly qualifies as more annoying.

Many households are now being warned about fake 'missed delivery' cards posted through letterboxes.

The small A5-sized cards look remarkably like the ones left by Royal Mail, yet try to scam people out of almost fifty quid.

The 'Something For You' cards urge people to call an 0208 number to get the parcel redelivered, even if it is just being held at the depot.

Credit: Action Fraud

Coloured red, like the Royal Mail ones, and copying their 'Bring ID' stamp in the top right hand corner, they inform recipients that their parcel is 'being held at one of our depots' and ask to call the scam number.

The same number is provided for redelivery.

The only subtle difference is the Royal Mail crest missing from the top right-hand corner.

After ringing the Great London landline number, an automated message asks for your details and consignment number. Users claimed that they were charged £45 for the pleasure.

It's not yet clear if the victims were changed for the phone call or were tricked into handing over the money.

Action Fraud said: "If in doubt, do not call the number provided, give your card details or personal information, and get in contact with us."

Royal Mail added: "Our security team is looking into this incident as a matter of urgency.

"Customers should check delivery cards very carefully to ensure they are genuine, and remain vigilant.

"Although this card is similar to one of our Something For You cards, the Royal Mail logo is crucially missing.

"Customers should also consider whether they are expecting a delivery from the company named on the card."

A post shared 60,000 times on Facebook said: "Fake parcel notes - the fake one will charge you £45 if you call the number and does not have a Post Office logo on.

"Please don't get conned. Was told about this today and had to share. Please be aware. Fake at the top."

Another Twitter user asked householders to be 'vigilant' against the fake notes.

Credit: PA

Anyone who is suspicious should contact Citizens Advice or Action Fraud for further guidance.

As technology advances, sadly so do the fraudsters. Earlier this year, reports were made of a text scam clearing people's bank accounts.

A message, supposedly from your bank, texts you about suspicious activity on your account. Upon replying, obviously worried about what could be happening, you start revealing personal details in response.

If you are concerned about anything that could be remotely suspicious there are plenty of websites to be searched and hotlines to be phoned to assist you.

Featured Image Credit: PA

Michael Minay

Mike Minay is a trending journalist at LADbible. He’s co-ordinated interviews with some of the big names from the world of news and sport including ITV’s Robert Peston, Sky Sports’ Jeff Stelling and darts champion Michael van Gerwen. His reporting days began on University radio in Birmingham, before moving to BBC Sport Online – creating content for large events such as Wimbledon and the FA Cup final. Mike still commentates on Football League matches at the weekend. A Manchester LAD at heart.

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