Man Killed By 'World's Most Dangerous Bird'

A 75-year-old man has been killed by a large, flightless creature that is considered to be the 'world's most dangerous bird'.

Police found the Florida man badly hurt by a cassowary. The bird has four-inch claws that are likened to daggers.

According to authorities, Marvin Hajos was attacked by the bird, after he fell over near it. He was taken to hospital by paramedics, but died later on from his injuries

According to San Diego Zoo, they are the most dangerous in the world. Alachua County Sheriff Department said the man was probably injured by the bird's claws.

Police are investigating the incident but say it is likely to be a 'tragic accident'.

According to initial reports, the man was breeding the birds, which are usually found in Australia and New Guinea. He is known as an experienced breeder and is said to have kept other kinds of exotic animals for decades.

"It looks like it was accidental," deputy chief Jeff Taylor told the Gainesville Sun newspaper.

"My understanding is that the gentleman was in the vicinity of the bird and at some point fell. When he fell, he was attacked."

Cassowaries are likened to velociraptors. Credit: PA
Cassowaries are likened to velociraptors. Credit: PA

They confirmed that the cassowary was still located in the building.

Police added that the cassowary involved in the attack 'remains secured on private property'.

The victim's partner also told the Gainesville Sun newspaper that he had died 'doing what he loved'.

Similar to the emu, cassowaries are one of the biggest species in the world. They can reach a massive 6ft in height and can weigh up to 60kg.

Their long claws 'can slice open any predator or potential threat with a single swift kick'. They are also known as 'Australia's Velociraptor' thanks to their dinosaur-like head and face.

Although they are usually thought of as shy and reclusive, like any animal, they can become violent when they feel threatened or cornered.

They're not usually found in the US, but they are sought out by exotic animal lovers and do require a permit to own.

Featured Image Credit: Twitter/@mattstaggs

Amelia Ward

Amelia Ward is a journalist at LADbible. She studied Multimedia Journalism at the University of Salford, before going on to work in music PR. She has also written for the M.E.N Group and various other publications.

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