Hurricane Irma brought unheard-of levels of relentless destruction when it swept through the Caribbean and on to America.

While communities try to recover in the aftermath of the storm, images of the devastation caused by the storm have certainly left an impression.

There have also been unexpected results, however. The Daily Mail reports that Irma also unearthed a 'centuries-old' canoe, believed to have belonged to Native Americans, from the bottom of a Florida river.

Credit: Randy Shots

Officials say the winds brought the canoe to the surface of the Indian River, before it was discovered by a photographer riding his bike by the river.

Randy Lathrop immediately informed the Division of Historical Resources, according to ABC News - as well as snapping a few pictures, obviously.

Lathrop believes it weighed "almost 700 pounds, but might as well have weighed 1,000 pounds" as it had "been water soaked for years."

"My main concern was to secure it from harm's way," he said. "I was able to go half a mile away and get my friend with a truck and we struggled to get into the back of the truck."

Credit: Randy Shots

The photographer shared the pictures he took to his Facebook page, writing: "Look what Irma kicked up out of the bottom of the Indian River, a dugout canoe. Florida State Dept of Historical Resources has been notified, they are sending an archaeologist in the morning.

"It is the law to notify the DHR (a gentle reminder, this belongs to the people of Florida, and hopefully will be preserved and exhibited in the future) Thank you all for your interest! I got to it before it was picked up by the county with all the other storm debris and placed in a landfill.

"I'll certainly keep everyone updated on this progress, promise. Thank you all for sharing and liking!! UPDATE: an archeologist has documented the artefact, it is safe in a water bath. Rumour has it [that it] may stay in this county for future public view! History saved, for the public. Thank you all!!!"

Credit: Randy Shots

The Florida Division of Historical Resources are currently waiting to find out more details about the artifact, which they'll get from radiocarbon dating.

"The compartments are a bit out of the ordinary... The square nails are cut nails. Cut nails were first in production in the early 19th century so that helps to indicate it is a historic canoe," said Sarah Revell, spokeswoman for the Florida Division of Historical Resources.

This is quite a find.

Featured Image Credit: Randy Shots

Mark McGowan

Mark is a journalist at LADbible, who joined in 2015 after a year as a freelance writer. In the past he blogged for independent football fan channel Redmen TV, after graduating from Staffordshire University with degrees in journalism and English literature. He has worked on campaigns such as UOKM8? and IIOC.

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