When it happened, people couldn't actually believe that the US President's Twitter account had been temporarily deleted earlier this month. Sure enough, 11 minutes later it was reinstated, and the social networking site worked quickly to bounce back from the PR nightmare.

Despite the person behind the devilish move remaining nameless for weeks, people were calling for them to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Finally, after nearly four weeks of upholding their anonymity, they've been unmasked.

Bahtiyar Duysak was born and raised in Germany but has Turkish roots.

Credit: Tech Crunch

According to Tech Crunch, he is 'quick to smile; he's close to his family and has a big network of friends; and he speaks with a certain kind of indeterminate European accent - the kind you often hear from people who have travelled, lived and studied across different countries'.

The 20-something employee actually worked in the division which deals with customer support and they are alerted when someone issues a bad behaviour report against a particular user. You can only imagine how many alerts they would get every day.

But after shutting down the account belonging to one of the most powerful men in the world, Bahtiyar isn't exactly patting himself on the back. He's told the online publication: "In my opinion, it was definitely a mistake and if I am involved in this I really apologise if I hurt anyone, so I didn't do anything on purpose.

"But as I said, I had a wild time in America and I was tired sometimes and everyone can do mistakes.

"I didn't hack anyone, I didn't do anything that I wasn't authorised to do, I didn't go to any site or tool where I wasn't supposed to be at, I didn't do any crime and I underline it that I comply with all rules."

Tech Crunch adds that on his last day, Bahtiyar was informed about reports on Trump's account and as his last direction at the company was to 'set the wheels in motion' to have the page deactivated. Once it was done, he literally closed his computer and left the office building for the last time.

He was a contract employee at Twitter and had also worked at similar sites, including YouTube, according to Buzzfeed. One of Mr Duysak's mates has told the site: "He seemed like he was happy with his job.

"He was a contractor, so I assumed he was doing something simple. I cannot believe he had access to deactivate the most important account in the world."

In a thread, a statement from Twitter reads: "We hold all accounts to the same Rules, and consider a number of factors when assessing whether Tweets violate our Rules. Among the considerations is 'newsworthiness' and whether a Tweet is of public interest.

"This has long been internal policy and we'll soon update our public-facing rules to reflect it."

The Secret Service is reportedly not investigating the incident and the FBI hasn't been drawn in on commenting.

Sources: Tech Crunch, Buzzfeed

Featured Image Credit: PA

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