Can you imagine stumbling out of the pub at kicking out time and not going directly to the kebab shop to stuff your face full of delicious, disgusting, greasy goodness? It doesn't even bear thinking about.

However, we may be forced to consider the possibility of this becoming a reality, as the EU soon decides on whether or not a key ingredient used in your doner should be banned.

Phosphates used in kebab meat are what fans say gives their favourite snack its unique taste, but officials are looking to get the additive outlawed amid concerns that it could cause heart disease.

Kebab shop bosses have been left fuming at the news, saying that the phosphates are essential to keep the meat nice and juicy while it rotates away on its vertical rotisserie.

The Health Committee has objected to a proposal by the European Commission (EC) to allow frozen doner meat to contain the additive.

"They are looking for ways to hurt Turkish businesses here," explained Baris Donmez, the owner of a 24-hour kebab bistro in Berlin's Mitte district, to The Daily Mail.

"Such a ban would be the biggest pile of garbage imaginable."

"If the European Parliament gets its way, this would be the death sentence for the entire doner kebab industry in the European Union," Kenan Koyuncu of the German Association of Doner Kebab Producers told Germany's Bild daily newspaper.

However, there is still a glimmer of hope for everyone's favourite post-pub snack. A rejection by the full Parliament when it meets again in two weeks would send the proposal back to the Commission, meaning we could hang on to our beloved Turkish meat a little while longer.

Renate Sommer, a member of German Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservative party in the European Parliament, posted to Facebook, saying that "a ban of the phosphate addition would be the end of doner production and would lead to the loss of thousands of jobs."

The concerns over the use of phosphate are due to the fact that its use in various meats could cause cardiovascular disease.

A number of studies have linked the additive to the development of heart problems, sparking health concerns about its use in kebabs.

It's unclear what will happen just yet, but If I were you, I'd get yourself down to the kebab shop sharpish and have your fill while there's still time.

Featured Image Credit: PA

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