A woman has found a unique way to take on catcallers and send a powerful message about sexual harassment.

According to research published last year, 85% of young women in the UK have experienced street harassment, and 45% of young women have experienced it in the form of sexual touching. Obviously that's not on.

Noa Jansma, a 20-year-old student from Amsterdam, responds to the unwarranted remark by taking selfies with every man who catcalls her.

She doesn't even have to take the pictures on the sly - in each instance she asks the men, who willingly pose, often grinning. Over the course of the month-long project, only one man asked her reason for taking a picture.

Explaining her project, Jansma writes that being catcalled is 'not a compliment'.

She writes: "This Instagram has the aim to create awareness about the objectification of women in daily life.

"Since many people still don't know how often and in whatever context 'catcalling' happens, I'll be showing my catcallers within the period of one month."

"[In the selfies] both the objectification and the object are assembled in one composition. Myself, as the object, standing in front of the catcallers represents the reversed power ratio which is caused by this project."

She amassed 30 posts in just a month and the account has amassed over 45,000 followers. However she was catcalled even more frequently than the number of posts suggest as often she didn't feel safe enough to ask the men for a picture.

Drawing the project to a close, she wrote on Instagram: "My month of posts has ended, but it doesn't mean that catcallers are in the past as well. To show that it's a global phenomenon and that this art project is not only about me, I'll pass on the account to different girls around the world."

Featured Image Credit: Instagram

James Dawson

James Dawson is a Journalist at LADbible. He has contributed articles to LADbible’s ‘Knowing Me, Knowing EU’ series on the EU referendum, the 'Electoral Dysfunction' series on the 2017 general election, the ‘U OK M8?’ series tackling mental health amongst young men, and for its ‘Climate Change’ initiative in partnership with National Geographic.

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