If you've ever watched a huge lightning storm roll past, you'll know it can be incredibly entertaining, so long as you're safely indoors and out of harm's way.

Seeing the quick flash of lightning, with its electric branches firing towards the earth, before thunder either cracks through the air or rumbles ominously in the distance can provide entertainment for hours.

However, one man in Norway found himself a little too close to the action while he was trying to film a storm near his home.

Credit: Storyful

The photographer points his camera out into the distance, but little did he know that lightning would strike so close. To be fair, it's not the smartest thing on the planet to stand outside during a lightning storm, especially when he has what appears to be a metal clothesline nearby.

It sounds like a bomb explodes and the aftermath looks similar. When he bravely steps outside to examine the damage, you can see chunks of concrete and grass strewn across the deck. He's lucky that the lightning struck just to the right of him; any closer and he could have been seriously injured.

It was an impressive snapshot of nature, but the footage doesn't compare to the incredible clip captured by 23-year-old student Alex Sawyer. He was fascinated by a storm rolling through his area and tried to film it on Snapchat.

He managed to capture the moment a huge bolt of lightning strikes just 20 metres in front of him and his friends, describing it as 'fire raining down from the sky'.

Credit: SWNS

"My friends and I were all watching the lightning and I thought, 'This will make a great Snapchat'," he said. "The next thing I know there's fire raining down from the sky. Torrential rain. We were right in the middle of it.

"[There were] a few damaged chimneys. Maybe a fire broke out. I can't be too sure. I definitely had to go to the toilet after I saw the lightning bolt hit the house.

"You don't get lightning like that in London, you see."

Lightning

Credit: PA.

For those interested, lightning is black body radiation from the very hot plasma that's created by the electron flow when electrically charged regions of a cloud are discharged. It's believed that there are about 40-50 lightning strikes hitting earth every second, which translates to around 1.4 billion every year.

Seventy percent of strikes occur around the tropics, however the place which receives the most amount of strikes per year is the small village of Kifuka in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Other hotspots include Venezuela, Singapore and in Central Florida.


Featured Image Credit: Storyful

Stewart Perrie

Stewart Perrie is a Trending Journalist at LADbible. His first job was as a newsreader and journalist at the award winning Sydney radio station, Macquarie Radio. He was solely responsible for the content broadcast on multiple stations across Australia when the MH17, Germanwings and AirAsia disasters unfolded. Stewart has covered the conflict in Syria for LADbible, interviewing a doctor on the front line, and has contributed to the hugely successful UOKM8 campaign.

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