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Charity Steps In To Re-Locate Elephant At Risk Of Being Legally Killed

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Charity Steps In To Re-Locate Elephant At Risk Of Being Legally Killed

An elephant is at risk of being legally shot and killed if he doesn't stop trampling crops as he attempts to return to the place he spent 45-years living at.

The six-and-a-half tonne elephant, named Riff Raff, spent over four decades living on a reserve - however, he has since been relocated 40 miles away after farmers complained about him walking over fences and eating crops.

Credit: Humane Society International
Credit: Humane Society International

Despite the move, Riff Raff seems keen to return to the place he's called home and has made his way back to his old reserve - leaving a trail of destruction behind him. Well, we can't really blame him for returning to his old home, can we? Elephants never forget and all that...

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Now, the Humane Society International is moving Riff Raff 300 miles away in an attempt to save him from being shot by pissed-off villagers.

Audrey Delsink, the charity's executive director, told the Mirror: "If he stays, he'll almost certainly be killed."

In moving Riff Raff so far from his home in Limpopo province, South Africa, there will be a number of obstacles in his way, such as mountains and motorways.

Speaking about his new home, Audrey added: "He'll be the oldest, most dominant bull in a much larger reserve - with many new, unrelated females.

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Credit: Humane Society International
Credit: Humane Society International

"At 45, he's a prime bull. He'll be the females' first choice, so will definitely be siring offspring for many years to come.

"This is utopia for a bull elephant wanting to mate."

The major move operation will set the charity back around £7,000 ($8,990) and will require a team of experts, a crane, helicopter and massive crates to get him there.

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According to the charity, 50 elephants who - like Riff Raff - have been marked as a nuisance by villagers have been legally killed in the last year.

But Audrey thinks this isn't the solution to the problem, saying: "It's not the fault of these amazing creatures that humans want to share their land, we have to find non-lethal solutions.

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"It's a problem South Africa's wildlife faces time and again, as fences prevent migration.

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"Just killing wildlife who get in our way is not the answer."

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Featured Image Credit: Humane Society International

Topics: World News, Elephant, Animals

Claire Reid
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