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Injured Owl Has Nice Warm Bath While Being Taken Care Of

Injured Owl Has Nice Warm Bath While Being Taken Care Of

We all know there's not many things that feel better than getting into a nice, warm bubble bath. Which is why this injured owl is our spirit animal:

The little fella enjoyed the soapy bath after a member of the public took him to a veterinary emergency hospital in Sydney.

Registered Veterinary Technician Ornella Jebrail, 28, said the owl had been found stuck to a rat trap with oil burns all over its skin.

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Ornella said: "We were unsure if it was related to the glue on the trap that caused a skin reaction or if it were oil burns unrelated to the trap."

Credit: Caters
Credit: Caters

The bath was recommended by a raptor specialist vet following the owl's injury assessment.

Luckily, the owl had no additional injuries and was given pain relief while flamazine cream was rubbed onto its skin.

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Ornella added: "In the morning it was collected by a wildlife carer who then dropped it off at the raptor specialist we were in contact with. It will be treated until the burns are healed and then released back into the wild."

Fingers (claws) crossed, this bird will still be able to fly... the same can't be said for an owl that was rescued from a ditch in the UK after a passerby thought it was injured and it just turned out it was a little too heavy, with the creature weighing in at 245 grams.

Credit: Suffolk Owl Sanctuary/Facebook
Credit: Suffolk Owl Sanctuary/Facebook

The bird was spotted by a landowner and taken to Suffolk Owl Sanctuary, hoping the experts could nurse it back to full health. All that was needed for the owl was a better diet and some exercise.

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Staff at the sanctuary said the bird was 'simply extremely obese' and 'unable to fly effectively', and set about making it lose between 20 and 30 grams.

According to the BBC, while 245 grams might not sound like a lot of weight, it's actually around a third heavier than what you'd normally expect for an Athene noctua.

The sanctuary wrote on Facebook: "This is extremely unusual for wild birds to get into this condition naturally, so we needed to investigate some obvious scenarios - the first being that she was possibly an escaped aviary bird.

"Sadly there was no indication of rings or chip identification, and asking around in the local area didn't give us any leads."

Featured Image Credit: Caters

Topics: Community, Animals

Rebecca Shepherd

I'm Becky - a journalist at LADbible. I graduated with a First Class BA in Journalism before going on to cover criminal court cases, medical tribunals and breaking news for the national media - which inevitably and eventually became as glum as it sounds. Can often be found rocking a bag for life - which I made a 'thing' way before Rihanna. You can contact me at [email protected]