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Footy Wife Slammed After Promoting Herbal Medicine That's Just Ground Up Rice

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Footy Wife Slammed After Promoting Herbal Medicine That's Just Ground Up Rice

A woman has been slammed for promoting a herbal medicine that's nothing more than 'ground-up rice'.

Alternative medicine has been on the rise throughout the world as people get sucked in to dodgy information circulated on the internet, which can sometimes have very negative circumstances.

That's why Taylor Winterstein, who's married to Penrith Panthers player Frank Winterstein, has been railed by a doctor on A Current Affair for spruiking the PXP Royale.

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Ms Winterstein's website says the medicine has been used for centuries in China and emperors and their families would use the magical dust, which was derived from purple rice, to make them better.

According to Channel 9, website testimonials say the medicine improved a boy's autism symptoms while another said their eyesight was better after taking the drug.

Surgeon Dr John Cunningham told the TV channel: "There's nothing magic about it. [It's] just ground-up rice.

Credit: A Current Affair/Channel 9
Credit: A Current Affair/Channel 9
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"Every doctor has a duty to look after the health of the public, and it's not just our right but it's our duty to call a spade a spade and to tell people that stuff like PXP is just rubbish.

"My concern is that people take this stuff and two things are happening.

"One is, they're wasting their money, and for this product a large amount of money; and secondly, they may be led to believe they don't need to take their legitimate treatments, their effective treatments for conditions they may actually have."

These things aren't cheap either, with 150g bottle going for $150 and a 454g one selling at $275.

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Dr John Cunningham. Credit: A Current Affair/Channel 9
Dr John Cunningham. Credit: A Current Affair/Channel 9

To take it to another level, Ms Winterstein isn't happy about vaccines. Speaking to the Daily Telegraph last month, she said: "Vaccines are not safe and effective for everyone.

"A 'one size fits all' schedule does not fit all bio-individual children, and where there is risk there must always be choice.

"If anything, I am an ex-vaxxer and I stand for informed consent, freedom of choice and vaccine injury awareness."

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LADbible has reached out to Ms Winterstein for comment.

Featured Image Credit: Taylor Winterstein/Instagram

Topics: Interesting, Community, Australia

Stewart Perrie
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