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Former Cocaine Kingpin Says Inmates Deserve Phone Calls To Kids At Christmas

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Former Cocaine Kingpin Says Inmates Deserve Phone Calls To Kids At Christmas

A former cocaine kingpin has revealed that he believes inmates should be allowed mobile phones to make calls to loved ones from their cells - especially over the festive period.

Richard Jones, a former prisoner, has spoken about the benefits having a phone to yourself can bring and thinks it was the same for others.

Richard Jones. Credit: Richard Jones
Richard Jones. Credit: Richard Jones

Speaking to the Daily Star, the 51-year-old explained: "These phones are invaluable and the public needs to be aware that it's not about selling drugs or anything untoward.

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"It is simply about speaking to your kids on Christmas Day or on their birthday.

"On Christmas, you are still only allowed access to a phone maybe once or twice during the day so that isolates you by having to make calls at a certain time.

"There is nothing worse than ringing home from the landing and you ask 'how is it going' and they are just putting the dinner on and you have to call back in 10 minutes but you can't.

"All of a sudden there is an argument and Christmas is ruined."

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He went on to add: "If you had a phone in your cell you could make that call back in 10 minutes and that is like normality which makes a big difference to the person inside, the person outside and to their kids and families, it is just huge."

Jones served in the army before turning to crime. Credit: Richard Jones
Jones served in the army before turning to crime. Credit: Richard Jones

It seems Richard might have a point as well because, according to the Ministry of Justice, inmates who continue their family ties after being locked up are 40 percent less likely to reoffend.

Richard, who was part of a gang that smuggled £3 million worth of cocaine from London to Gloucestershire and Bristol, was handed a 15 year sentence in 2012.

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During his time behind bars, he was given a cordless phone and says it gave him privacy when his dad was seriously poorly.

He went on: "I was able to sit in my cell and speak to my wife at the time about my dad's condition and I could be prepared for the bad news if it was going to be upsetting.

"I wouldn't be with 40 or 50 blokes wondering 'why is that man in bits'."

He also believes having access to a phone was invaluable to others as well, explaining: "I had a co-defendant when I was there and he would spend a lot of time on the phone and he would put his son on the phone while his boy was watching a film and they would talk about it."

Featured Image Credit: Richard Jones

Topics: UK Community, inmate, Community, UK, Prison

Rebecca Shepherd
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