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Ship That Ships Ships Is Totally Baffling The Internet

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Ship That Ships Ships Is Totally Baffling The Internet

Have you ever wondered how ships are transported to different parts of the world? Wonder no more because here it is: meet the Blue Marlin:

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The incredible boat can carry 75,000 tonnes moves around oil rigs too and even an aircraft for the Australian Navy.

According to the MailOnline, the dimensions of the Blue Marlin are eye watering. It is an incredible 712 ft long and 138ft deep - and has a deck the size of two football pitches.

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There is a crew of 24 on board and it can reach a speed of 13 knots which is enabled by the use of 17,000 horse power diesel engines.

Credit: YouTube/VEKA
Credit: YouTube/VEKA

Enough about Marlin though. People have been left puzzled by what they're witnessing and, as per usual, have taken to social media platforms to air their shock.

One wrote: "Shipping ship shipping shipping ships," ok that's enough, fella.

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Another added: "Holy s*** it's also carrying an oil rig," with someone else chiming in: "Not just any oil rig either, one of the largest in the world."

"Imagine the weight of that f***in thing," another said, while another asked: "How are they even stacking these ships without them getting crushed like soda cans?!"

Credit: YouTube/VEKA
Credit: YouTube/VEKA

When it comes to things like this, no question is too daft. So when someone asked: "How do they get them on there? Absolutely gigantic forklifts?" There was actually a reasonable answer.

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It was: "I think I recall this ship has large ballast tanks in the back two corners (and probably elsewhere). It fills those up with water so that the flat lower deck is submerged and then you float your vessel just above the submerged deck.

"The ship then empties its ballast tanks and the deck rises above the waterline and with it the vessel on the deck. I think they usually have placeholders too strapped on the deck so that when the deck gets raised your vessel nestles into the placeholders upright instead of just laying flat on its side.

"How the hell they got those smaller ships in the picture stacked like that beats me. They're all on one big pallet on the bottom though, so however they got them stacked, they definitely probably floated that stacked pallet and used the process I said above to get it on the biggest ship's deck."

Featured Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Topics: Viral, Ship, Community

Rebecca Shepherd
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