Advert

How To Vote In Eurovision 2021 And How It Works

Published 
| Last updated 

How To Vote In Eurovision 2021 And How It Works

The Eurovision final is fast approaching and the UK could be in with a chance of winning this year with James Newman, who will perform 'Embers' at the finals.

After Flo Rida's appearance left viewers a bit confused, there's one more small matter which tends to trip people up each year - and that's how the infamous "Eurovision system" works.

The song contest, which has seen countries in Europe and beyond battle it out, has been going since 1956 and in that time, there have been various voting systems.

Why can't the UK take part in the semi-finals?

Advert

The UK isn't required to take part in the semi-finals because, as one of the 'Big Five,' it bypasses this stage in the competition.

The 'Big Five' countries are the ones which contribute the most financially towards European broadcast television. Those countries are: UK, France, Germany, Italy and Spain.

Eurovision 2021 theme is 'Open Up' ' Credit: Eurovision
Eurovision 2021 theme is 'Open Up' ' Credit: Eurovision

Traditionally, the 'Big Five' and the host country - the Netherlands this year - go straight to the finals.

Advert

From each semi-final, the best 10 acts go through to the grand final, as well as the 'Big Five' and the host country, which makes 26 finalists in total.

Can the UK still vote in the semi-finals?

Yes. UK residents can still vote for countries in the semi-finals, even though the UK isn't required to compete in this stage of the competition itself.

Can you vote for your own country in Eurovision?

Advert

No, you can't vote for your own country "out of fairness," says Eurovision. For obvious reasons, you can't vote for your own country because it would just come down to which country has the greatest number of viewers.

Eurovision voting explained

The latest update to the Eurovision voting system was in 2016, which Eurovision was kind enough to give us an explainer video for (see below).

Advert

The winner of Eurovision comes from two sets of votes: the public vote from televoting and the professional jury vote.

After all of the performances, a spokesperson will be asked to present the scores given by the professional jury. They'll rank their favourite songs, with the first being the best and last being the worst.

Following this, the votes from viewers are counted for each country and those scores are combined with the professional jury rankings to determine the winner.

Eurovision 1957 presenter and her
Eurovision 1957 presenter and her
Advert

The National Jury then awards 12 points to the winner, 10 points for the runner-up and then 8-1 points for the remaining 7 top-ranked acts.

It sounds confusing, but it's actually not once you get your head around it, and it's a fair way of voting which allows viewers at home to have their say.

Eurovision 2021: How to vote

Viewers are invited to cast their vote either by SMS, telephone or the official Eurovision app.

There's more information on voting in Eurovision here.

Featured Image Credit: Eurovision/NPO/AVROTROS/NOS

Topics: Music, TV & Film, Eurovision

Laura Sanders
Advert
Advert
Advert

Chosen for YouChosen for You

News

Dominic Cummings Releases WhatsApp Messages Appearing To Show Boris Johnson Calling Matt Hancock 'Hopeless'

12 hours ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

News

Ex-Adult Film Star Lana Rhoades Wants All Her Videos Deleted

5 hours ago