Advert

Latest

Adorable Golden Retriever Has Thousands Of Instagram Followers Due To Unusual Markings
published atin 5 minutes
Advert
Advert

Most Popular

Advert
Entertainment

'Britain's Got Talent' Winner Lost Voice Guy Opens Up About His Love Life

'Britain's Got Talent' Winner Lost Voice Guy Opens Up About His Love Life

A solid sense of humour is usually fairly handy in the dating game, but it only works if you've actually got the confidence to approach the person you fancy.

And it turns out that Lost Voice Guy doesn't have that confidence.

He may have won Britain's Got Talent at the weekend, but he's now come out and said that his mum often has to chat up potential girlfriends for him.

Advert

Lost Voice Guy lives with cerebral palsy, which caused him to lose his voice at a young age. He now communicates with a text-to-speech app and an iPad.

The comedian, real name Lee Ridley, has spoken to the Daily Mirror about his lack of confidence with the opposite sex.

"It's quite hard to chat people up when you can't speak," he told the newspaper.

"I don't have the ability to 'chat up' a woman."

Advert

Credit: Instagram/lostvoiceguy
Credit: Instagram/lostvoiceguy

He continued: "The best I could do is 'type up' a woman, but that just sounds wrong. You type up your dissertation, you type up the list of the jobs you have to do around the house... There's nothing sexy about being typed up.

"And even if there was, most people tend to judge on looks alone; they've already made their minds up about this disabled guy in front of them before I've managed to say a word."

More Like ThisMore Like This

1 of 6
Britain's Got Talent Fans Believe They've Worked Out 'Fake' Stunt
Entertainment

Britain's Got Talent Fans Believe They've Worked Out 'Fake' Stunt

Advert

Lee's prize will see him perform at the Royal Variety Show as well as receiving a massive £250,000 ($334,000), which he's joked he will spend getting new accents and voices for his iPad.

He wore a t-shirt at the live final that said, 'I was disabled before it was popular'.

He's also shared a photo of him and Dec, with the caption 'It wasn't a dream then?!'

Advert

Speaking to the Mirror about his younger years, he said, "I always had to rely on my parents to translate for me. You just don't want your mum there when you're trying to chat up a girl."

It's hard to work on your comedic timing when you're living with the condition too. "If I think of something funny to say, by the time I've typed it out, the moment has gone," he said.

"It can get frustrating when I try to do ­something and my body doesn't let me.

Advert

"Stuff like not being able to open a bottle. But I get over it and get on with my life."

Hopefully, now he's had the chance to show off his true personality on national TV, women will come flocking to him.

Featured Image Credit: ITV

Topics: TV and Film, Britain's Got Talent, UK Entertainment

Daisy Jackson

Daisy Jackson is a freelance writer, who has previously worked at Shortlist Media and Trinity Mirror. She has written about the Manchester terror attacks and appeared on BBC Five live to discuss the aftermath, as well as interviewing an orthopaedic surgeon in Syria.