Advert

Latest

an hour ago
Advert
2 hours ago
Advert

Most Popular

15 hours ago
Advert

Louis Theroux 'Interested' In Making A Documentary With Tommy Robinson

Louis Theroux 'Interested' In Making A Documentary With Tommy Robinson

Louis Theroux says he would consider doing a documentary with far right activist and EDL founder Tommy Robinson.

Robinson, real name Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, has been making headlines over the last few weeks; he was found to be in contempt of court for live-streaming defendants accused of the sexual exploitation of young girls in breach of a reporting ban and is waiting to be sentenced this week.

Advert

Film-maker and journalist Louis, who is no stranger to dealing with controversial personalities, told LADbible that he would consider following Tommy Robinson for a documentary.

His When Louis Met... series saw the film-maker spend time with personalities including Chris Eubank, Ann Widdecombe and Jimmy Savile.

"That's an interesting idea," he said. "I would never rule it out. I'm sort of at the point where I'm pretty up for trying different things and a single person profile - I think would be fun.

"Now I think it's a case of finding the right person to do it and doing it in a way that feels a bit different from how we did it before. Tommy Robinson, Stephen Yaxley-Lennon as his actual name is - I think he's going to court? I'd have to look in to that."

Advert

Louis said he doesn't 'buy' the idea that not being allowed to report on active court cases, as Yaxley-Lennon tried outside Leeds Crown Court in 2018, means that freedom of speech is being violated - or in fact that violating these rules is in the public interest.

"All the media is subject to the same reporting restrictions and those are part of the collection of rules that guarantee your right to a fair trial," he said.

Since being found in contempt of court, Yaxley-Lennon has asked Donald Trump for asylum in USA, hoping to emigrate there. Credit: PA
Since being found in contempt of court, Yaxley-Lennon has asked Donald Trump for asylum in USA, hoping to emigrate there. Credit: PA

He said he has also looked at revisiting the neo-Nazi girls in folk band Prussian Blue, who he met in his Weird Weekends series.

When he's not thinking about his own TV projects, Theroux admits he does try to keep up with big TV trends, including reality shows like Love Island - after his 13-year-old son started to watch it.

"I'm just starting to see what a phenomenon it is, people getting steamy in hot tubs or what not, did we not see that on Big Brother back in the day?" he said.

"They basically create steamy moments between attractive young people."

At one stage in his life, Theroux says he might even have considered being a contestant on a reality TV show.

"I think if I was in my late teens, more confident and maybe better looking that I would've thought it was either a fun or profitable thing to do," he said. "But it's very hard to get myself back into that mindset. It was a long time ago.

"I've done a lot of things. I had my picture taken naked for an episode of Weird Weekends, I did a cover photo largely naked, wearing a feather boa. I can't really say I'm not used to surrendering my dignity, when I feel the moment is right."

He also admits he might not be best person to give advice on reality TV as a career path.

"It remains to be seen whether or not it's a fruitful career for these people. I would have advised Kim Kardashian against doing a sex tape with Ray J and look where that got her; she's one of the richest businesswomen and most recognised people on the planet, so I don't claim to be an authority on these things."

Theroux's new documentary sees him revisit the Westboro Baptist Church.

Louis with the Westboro Baptist Church. Credit: BBC
Louis with the Westboro Baptist Church. Credit: BBC

Following the death of their leader Fred Phelps (aka Gramps) in 2014, and several high profile defections, Louis goes back to catch up with the controversial church to see where they're headed and to meet their new recruits - including Simon, now known as Mathias, who moved to live with the church from Bradford, UK.

The Westboro Baptist Church and its members have publicly condemned gays, Catholics, orthodox Christians, Jewish people, Muslims, celebrities, American soldiers, politicians and a range of other groups, organisations and individuals. They're known for acts like picketing the funerals of soldiers, among others.

But Theroux found that taking Gramps out of the equation had made a big impact on the group.

"He was picketing, using offensive words for homosexuality, going to the funerals of soldiers killed in Iraq and Afghanistan. I think it was his sort of hate, his poisonous contrary personality that basically dictated why they did what they did," he said.

"And once he died he died, obviously that was removed."

Louis Theroux: Surviving America's Most Hated Family is on BBC Two, 9pm on Sunday 14 July.

Featured Image Credit: BBC

Topics: TV and Film, louis theroux, UK Entertainment

Amelia Ward

Amelia is a journalist at LADbible. After studying journalism at Liverpool John Moores and Salford Uni (don't ask), she went into the world of music. Quickly realising that you can't pay your bills with guestlist, she went back to her roots. In her spare time, Amelia likes music, Liverpool FC, and spending good, quality time with her cat, Paul. You can contact Amelia at [email protected]

 

Next Up

Leaked Plans Call For An End To Smoking In The UK By 2030

Leaked Plans Call For An End To Smoking In The UK By 2030

6 months ago