Advert

Latest

Celebrity Gogglebox Apologises To Eamonn Holmes Following 'Cruel Edit'
published at3 hours ago
Advert
Advert

Most Popular

Advert
Entertainment

Netflix's New Documentary Series Exhibit A Is Your Next True Crime Obsession

Netflix's New Documentary Series Exhibit A Is Your Next True Crime Obsession

Ever since shows like Making a Murderer and The Jinx hit our screens, the true crime renaissance has emerged and it shows absolutely no signs of slowing.

Advert

Whether you're a docu-series junkie or you're feeling the true crime fatigue, we have a good feeling you might just enjoy Netflix's latest contribution to the genre.

Described as a 'soul sister to Confession Tapes' (unsurprising since both shows are created by Kelly Loudenberg), Exhibit A is a four-part docu-series exploring how innocent people have been convicted with dubious forensic techniques and tools such as touch DNA and cadaver dogs.

Each episode tackles a different topic - video forensics, blood spatters, cadaver dogs and touch DNA.

But what makes it gripping is the examination of various cases of people who have been convicted using questionable evidence.

Exhibit A centres on what happens when forensic science goes wrong. Credit: Netflix
Exhibit A centres on what happens when forensic science goes wrong. Credit: Netflix
Advert

One of the episodes focuses on George Powell III, who was arrested and charged to 28 years imprisonment for robbing a shop in 2008.

Many have speculated the legitimacy of the case due to the CCTV footage which played a significant role in convicting Powell of the crime.

More Like This

1 of 6
Don't F*** With Cats Is Your Next True Crime Doc To Watch On Netflix
Entertainment

Don't F*** With Cats Is Your Next True Crime Doc To Watch On Netflix

The perpetrator caught on camera was described as being around 5ft 6in by the staff member who was working, but Powell stands at a tall 6ft 3in - a considerable height difference.

As a result, in January this year District Judge John Gauntt agreed to a retrial for Powell.

This is just one of several controversial cases that are spotlighted in the series, used to highlight flaws in the judicial system in America while encouraging viewers to see evidence more clearly.

Speaking to Paste Magazine about the show, creator Kelly said: "I think often when you have something called science, you take it at face value, but it's not.

"I think the next round of waves of exonerations will be from, and have been from, junk science. It's the leading cause of wrongful conviction. I think we just have to be now aware that this happens a lot."

The four-parter explores convictions based on dubious evidence. Credit: Netflix
The four-parter explores convictions based on dubious evidence. Credit: Netflix

Another unique point about the show is that it doesn't focus on gore or sensationalism. Instead, it's here to highlight the reality of the justice system and how damaging it can be - even when no one gets killed.

"A lot of people are convicted on bad science and it's handwriting, it's for fraudulent cheques. You know what I mean? It's not always bloody murder, like you'd see in Dexter," added Kelly.

Overall, Exhibit A is here to expose how reasonable doubt can show up in even the most seemingly concrete of evidence.

It's definitely an interesting watch, and one that is well worth a binge if you haven't already.

Featured Image Credit: Netflix

Topics: America, True Crime, Making A Murderer, Documentary, Netflix, US

Daisy Phillipson

Daisy is a UK-based freelance journalist with too many opinions. She loves everything film and music-related and has a track record writing for Little White Lies, BWRC, and Film Daily. Contact her at [email protected]