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People Think This Line In 'Fairytale Of New York' Is Not OK

People Think This Line In 'Fairytale Of New York' Is Not OK

Righto, folks. It is 1 December, and you know what that means.

Everyone is gearing up for Christmas as if they haven't already been doing it for the past two weeks, and we're slowly re-adjusting to the fact that we're only going to hear the same ten songs on repeat for the foreseeable future as the major supermarkets jostle to sell us booze and festive tat.

For many people, an oasis in the desert of Christmas schmaltz is Kirsty McColl and The Pogues' seminal Christmas classic 'Fairytale of New York'.

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It's not your average Christmas song - instead of cheese it revels in drunkenness, debauchery, and wistful nostalgia. That's the real meaning of Christmas, after all, isn't it?

The Pogues' Shane McGowan. Credit: Pogue Mahone Records
The Pogues' Shane McGowan. Credit: Pogue Mahone Records

But, like everything, it has to face up to the test of time. In these turbulent and ever-changing times, things that were OK just a few decades ago just aren't kosher anymore. That includes a whole raft of words.

'F*****' is definitely among them.

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If you're wondering which word we've starred out there, it's the one at the end of this rhyming couplet from the song: 'You scumbag, you maggot / You cheap lousy f*****'.

This makes 'Fairytale of New York' problematic, and loads of people think that is a good enough reason not to have the song in the regular Christmas circulation anymore.

That's before we get to some of the other lines that contain other words that just aren't particularly 2018-proof, either.

Here are just a few responses from Twitter:

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Credit: Twitter
Credit: Twitter
Credit: Twitter
Credit: Twitter
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Clearly, using a word that is outright offensive in a song that gets so much airtime is putting people out of joint. Who knew, eh?

Obviously, there are a whole host of other people who think that it's fine use that particular word in general - and surprisingly, there are a load more who actually admit to taking pride in it.

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On top of that, there are some arguing this is 'PC gone mad', and others suggesting that everyone is easily 'triggered' - despite being obviously 'triggered' at being told they shouldn't use a clearly offensive word. The irony.

Credit: Twitter
Credit: Twitter

So what can we take away from this? There is perhaps a case for saying that we shouldn't judge the works of the past on whether they're OK today. Just imagine To Kill a Mockingbird without the use of the N-word. It wouldn't have the same visceral punch and power that it does.

That said, if people want to walk around screaming lines of dialogue from Harper Lee books over the festive period, they've probably got larger problems.

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Maybe, just maybe, there is a case for NOT singing that word when you hear the song on this Christmas. You won't embarrass yourself or anyone else that way.

Also, maybe don't sing any of the words of 'Step Into Christmas'. It's just godawful.

Featured Image Credit: Pogue Mahone Records

Topics: Christmas, Entertainment News, Music, UK Entertainment, US Entertainment

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Tom Wood

Tom Wood is a freelance journalist and LADbible contributor. He graduated from University of London with a BA in Philosophy before studying for a Masters in Journalism at the University of Salford. He has previously written for the M.E.N Group as well as working for several top professional sports clubs. Contact him on [email protected]