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Bruce Lee's Daughter Responds To Quentin Tarantino's Comments About Her Father

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Bruce Lee's Daughter Responds To Quentin Tarantino's Comments About Her Father

Bruce Lee's daughter has responded to Quentin Tarantino's recent comments about her father, saying she feels 'tired of hearing from white men in Hollywood'.

Earlier this week, Tarantino appeared on Joe Rogan's podcast, The Joe Rogan Experience, while out promoting the new release of his novelisation of 2019 hit Once Upon A Time In Hollywood.

During the interview, he was asked about the criticism over the film's depiction of Bruce Lee, with a specific reference to a fight scene in which Brad Pitt's character Cliff knocks down Lee - played by Mike Toh.

Credit: Sony
Credit: Sony
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Tarantino brushed the backlash aside, simply saying: "I can understand his daughter having a problem with it, it's her f***ing father! I get that. But anybody else? Go suck a d***."

In a guest column for The Hollywood Reporter, the iconic martial artist's daughter Shannon Lee said Tarantino's depiction of her dad was 'inaccurate and unnecessary', being clear to not point any of the blame towards actor Toh.

She wrote: "Why does Quentin Tarantino speak like he knew Bruce Lee and hated him? It seems weird given he never met Bruce Lee, right? Not to mention that Mr. Tarantino happily dressed the Bride in a knock-off of my father's yellow jumpsuit and the Crazy 88s in Kato-style masks and outfits for Kill Bill, which many saw as a love letter to Bruce Lee.

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Shannon Lee. Credit: PA
Shannon Lee. Credit: PA

"[...] While I am grateful that Mr. Tarantino has so generously acknowledged to Joe Rogan that I may have my feelings about his portrayal of my father, I am also grateful for the opportunity to express this: I'm really f***ing tired of white men in Hollywood trying to tell me who Bruce Lee was."

Lee continued: "I'm tired of hearing from white men in Hollywood that he was arrogant and an a**hole when they have no idea and cannot fathom what it might have taken to get work in 1960s and '70s Hollywood as a Chinese man with (God forbid) an accent, or to try to express an opinion on a set as a perceived foreigner and person of color."

Bruce Lee in 1973. Credit: PA
Bruce Lee in 1973. Credit: PA
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She concluded: "At a time when Asian Americans are being physically attacked, told to 'go home' because they are seen as not American, and demonized for something that has nothing to do with them, I feel moved to suggest that Mr. Tarantino's continued attacks, mischaracterizations and misrepresentations of a trailblazing and innovative member of our Asian American community, right now, are not welcome."

Lee also encouraged Tarantino to 'take a pass' on commenting further about her father, and to 'reconsider the impact of our words in a world that doesn't need more conflict and fewer cultural heroes'.

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: Entertainment, TV and Film, Celebrity, Quentin Tarantino

Jess Hardiman
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