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The Witcher Season Two Will See All Characters Exist On Same Timeline

The Witcher Season Two Will See All Characters Exist On Same Timeline

If you enjoyed the first season of The Witcher, but found the use of multiple timelines a tad confusing, you'll be pleased to hear there'll be no such complications in the second series.

The Netflix series, starring Henry Cavill as protagonist Geralt of Rivia, had to halt production in the UK in March 'cause of... you know, that virus thing. But when we eventually do get to see it, we won't have to worry about keeping up with a plot that flicks between timelines.

The characters in season two of The Witcher will share a common timeline. Credit: Netflix
The characters in season two of The Witcher will share a common timeline. Credit: Netflix

The show's creator Lauren Hissrich explained that this storytelling device was used in the first season because the 'goal was to get to know each of these characters individually, and the only way to do that was to separate their timelines', but that will not be necessary this time around.

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Speaking to The Wrap, she said: "Obviously, it was one of the most controversial parts of season one and I didn't expect it to be as controversial as it was. But it's something I still stand behind, in terms of storytelling.

"What's great though is they have intersected now. So what we'll see in season two is that all of our characters are existing on the same timeline.

"What that allows us to do story-wise though is to play with time in slightly different ways. We get to do flashbacks, we get to do flash-forwards, we get to actually integrate time in a completely different way that we weren't able to do in season one.

"Because, if you can imagine, if we were in three different timelines [in season one) and then flashed forward or flashed back, we would have been in four or five or six timelines - even I know that's too much.

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"So I think it will be a lot easier for the audience to follow and understand, especially a new audience coming in. But there are still going to be some fun challenges with time."

Hey, I'm sure we'll all toss a coin to fun challenges with time (sorry 'new audience coming in', that reference clearly means nothing to you).

Production on season two was halted 'cause of coronavirus. Credit: Netflix
Production on season two was halted 'cause of coronavirus. Credit: Netflix

If you haven't seen it before, the show is based upon Polish writer Andrzej Sapowski's novels about a solitary monster hunter 'struggling to find his place in a world where people often prove more wicked than beasts'.

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The first season proved a hit with viewers and has an 8.3 rating on IMBd. It's not clear yet when season two will be released, because like all of us, the Witcher team is waiting for governments to tell them they can crack on once again.

Hissrich said: "Right now, it's a lot of production meetings, a lot of talking about how to keep people safe... A lot of it is just about flexibility, not just in the planning phases but when we get back on sets.

"It's about personal comfort and personal safety. So, the government may say it's OK to do X or Y, but an actor may say they don't feel comfortable doing that. And that's always going to be our first concern.

"So we're making all sorts of plans and accommodations and waiting for various governments to weigh in with their recommendations. And film commissions and Netflix. And yeah, it's going to impact story. It will have to. But one of the best things about being a writer on set is that I'm there to make those changes as we need them."

Featured Image Credit: Netflix

Topics: TV and Film, The Witcher, Netflix

Jake Massey

Jake Massey is a journalist at LADbible. He graduated from Newcastle University, where he learnt a bit about media and a lot about living without heating. After spending a few years in Australia and New Zealand, Jake secured a role at an obscure radio station in Norwich, inadvertently becoming a real-life Alan Partridge in the process. From there, Jake became a reporter at the Eastern Daily Press. Jake enjoys playing football, listening to music and writing about himself in the third person.