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Diver Comes Face To Face With Gigantic Shark

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Diver Comes Face To Face With Gigantic Shark

A man has come face to face with a gargantuan shark, managing to capture the incredible moment on camera.

John Moore, 55, was free-diving off the coast of Jupiter in Florida earlier this month when the huge female was swimming among a shiver of bull sharks.

The images show the female's sharp teeth up close and personal to Moore, who is a shark diver and photographer.

Credit: Caters
Credit: Caters
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He said: "She was an abnormally large female. Very likely pregnant and certainly hadn't skipped any meals. She was a very dominant shark, confidently coming right up to me throughout our dive."

He shared the spectacular images on Instagram, where he regularly posts about sharks he encounters on his dives.

Moore wrote: "Up close and personal inspection of the very impressive serrated teeth of a large female Bull shark. A fish had grabbed the chunk of bait and run toward me for cover, before getting scared and dropping the chunk.

Credit: Caters News
Credit: Caters News
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"This set me up for a shot that's even too close for my 20mm lens. Thanks for the setup to that Horse-eye Jack."

And what makes Moore even braver is the fact that bull sharks are the most dangerous shark in the world, according to National Geographic.

They tend to hunt in tropical shorelines, which is also where you're likely to find people swimming.

They live in warm shallow water around the world, but have also been known to swim into rivers.

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Although humans aren't their normal prey, bull sharks can eat most things. They have been known to eat dolphins, sea turtles and even other sharks.

Credit: Caters News
Credit: Caters News

Great whites and tiger sharks are the other sharks considered the most dangerous to humans - and one great white was reported to be heading to the UK.

A 17-foot great white shark has become only the second in history to cross the Atlantic and is heading in the direction of British shores.

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The 3,541lb female shark called Nukumi usually swims up and down the west coast of America and Canada and is tracked by science organisation OCEARCH

Nukumi's location was last tracked on 11 April, 1,700 nautical miles off British shores - and experts admitted: "She is capable of reaching the UK coast," despite usually staying away. It's not known where she has been since.

It's thought that she's on the move because she could be pregnant, and is looking for a place to give birth away from her aggressive male counterparts.

Credit: Ocearch
Credit: Ocearch
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But in a highly unusual move, the 50-year-old matriarch - the largest ever tagged in the region by scientists who are monitoring her - took a swerve east, across the Atlantic.

Migratory species like great white sharks rarely cross the Mid-Atlantic Ridge - a barrier in the middle of the ocean - but the little daredevil took the plunge earlier this month.

The only other great white shark tracked making the crossing was Lydia, in April 2014, which stunned scientists with an epic journey to the coast of Portugal.

Featured Image Credit: Caters

Topics: Animals

Amelia Ward
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