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Albino Elephant Calf Rescued After Being Trapped In Snare For Four Day

Albino Elephant Calf Rescued After Being Trapped In Snare For Four Day

An albino elephant calf has been rescued after being trapped in a barbaric snare for four days, having been left with horrific injuries - including a Joker-like scar across her face.

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The animal, a female called Khanyisa, has unique pink skin rather than the usual grey colour associated with elephants.

She was found tangled up in the snare at a private reserve close to the border of Kruger National Park, South Africa, completely alone.

Poor Khanyisa had severe lacerations to the back of both her ears and neck. The snare had also wrapped itself around her cheeks, cutting into her mouth on each side so that she tragically resembled Batman villain Joker.

In fact, the young elephant's wounds were so bad that maggots had started eating the open flesh decaying around her cheeks, in turn leaving gaping holes in her mouth.

Thankfully, Khanyisa was rescued from her ordeal by an elephant orphanage called Hoedspruit Elephant Rehabilitation and Development (HERD), and is now on the mend in her new home.

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Credit: StoryTrender
Credit: StoryTrender

Sue Howells, from the organisation, said: "She looked so innocent, fragile and pure, and yet so brave - a unique beauty who had been sadly mutilated by the hands of man.

"We knew we had to help her and protect her and give her a place of safety that she never has to endure such trauma again.

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"Khanyisa is an exceptionally strong and brave little elephant.

"She is incredibly resilient and has what seems to be an uncrushable spirit.

"Her sweet, fragile and thoughtful personality shines through her toughness, despite everything that she has endured at such a young age."

After the vulnerable animal was rescued, Adine Roode, the founder of HERD, decided to call her 'Khanyisa', which means 'light' in Shona - a Bantu language of the Shona people in Zimbabwe.

Now she is recovering happily at the orphanage, which was built to rehabilitate and hand rear elephant calves that have been displaced or orphaned.

Credit: StoryTrender
Credit: StoryTrender

The facility is located in the Kapama Game Reserve, and is purposely built to be near the close-knit Jabulani herd.

Allowing the baby elephants to live alongside a herd is something that's thought to be good for their emotional wellbeing, and helps them integrate more easily.

The website explains: "When a rescued orphan comes into the orphanage, it is traumatised and in many cases dehydrated, sunburnt and possibly injured.

"Because of their high intelligence and complexity, they are very different to your usual wild animal.

"Their needs are diverse and nuanced and require a special kind of management, one with heart and soul and respect as well as milk and medicine."

Featured Image Credit: StoryTrender

Topics: World News, south africa, News, elephants, Animals

Jess Hardiman

Jess is a journalist at LADbible who graduated from Manchester University with a degree in Film Studies, English Language and Linguistics - indecisiveness at its finest, right there. She also works for FOODbible and its sister page Seitanists, which are both a safe haven for her to channel a love for homemade pasta, fennel and everything else in between. You can contact Jess at [email protected]