Advert

Latest

UK Government Wants Netflix To Label The Crown As Fiction
published at33 minutes ago
Advert
Advert

Most Popular

Advert
News

​Footage Captures Rare Eagle Ray Swimming On Great Barrier Reef

​Footage Captures Rare Eagle Ray Swimming On Great Barrier Reef

A marine biologist in Australia has shared incredible footage of an endangered ornate eagle ray swimming on the Great Barrier Reef.

Jacinta Shackleton, a marine biologist and underwater videographer, said she was 'ecstatic' when she stumbled upon the extremely rare eagle ray back in March, not least because the graceful creature let her swim along with it for more than 10 minutes.

Two weeks later, she then came across another while free diving - and this time she was able to get an ID shot.

Advert

Shackleton, who is based on Lady Elliot Island on the southern Great Barrier Reef, shared the footage from the first ray on Instagram - where she regularly shares photos and video footage from her adventures underwater - saying the current pandemic has made her aware how 'just how fortunate' she is to have spent so much time immersed in nature.

Lady Elliot Island. Credit: PA
Lady Elliot Island. Credit: PA

Shackleton, 26, told LADbible: "I came across the first individual early in the morning in March and I was ecstatic.

"It was a very emotional encounter for me as I had never seen one before and the ray allowed me to glide along with it for over 10 minutes as I admired the incredible patterns on its back and extremely long whip-like tail.

Advert

"I then came across another individual two weeks later (again free diving) which also allowed me to take an ID shot."

More Like ThisMore Like This

1 of 6
News

Amateur Photographer Captures Rare 'Black' Tiger In India

She continued: "The ornate eagle ray is the largest of the eagle rays with a wingspan that can reach up to 4m!

News

Drone Captures Great White Shark Swimming 'At Least 20mph'

published at20 days ago

"This species is endangered and not seen frequently with only around 65 sightings recorded worldwide! It was first described in the 1850s with population numbers declining since, mainly due to pressure from commercial fishing.

Advert

"Each individual has a unique pattern on its dorsal surface and this is what we use to differentiate between individuals but overall little is known about this species."

Credit: Jacinta Shackleton
Credit: Jacinta Shackleton

Shackleton also said she's been lucky to have many other amazing encounters during her time as a marine biologist, having even once seen a baby humpback whale breach in front of her.

She continued: "I spend every minute possible in the ocean which has allowed me to have some incredible encounters.

Advert

"I have been face to face with a tiger shark, seen a great hammerhead shark chase a baby eagle ray, witnessed a dolphin feeding right in front of me and I've also had a baby humpback whale breach just as it was swimming towards me, before meeting up with its mother again.

"I consider myself extremely lucky to have these experiences and encourage everyone to book a trip to the Great Barrier Reef and experience the magic for themselves!"

Featured Image Credit: Jacinta Shackleton

Topics: News, Animals, Australia

Chosen for YouChosen for You

Boris Johnson Says People Who Test Negative For Covid-19 Could Be Released From Tier 3 Restrictions
published at3 days ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

News

You Can Now Get Lotus Biscoff KitKat Chunky

published ata day ago

Jess Hardiman

Jess is a journalist at LADbible who graduated from Manchester University with a degree in Film Studies, English Language and Linguistics - indecisiveness at its finest, right there. She also works for FOODbible and its sister page Seitanists, which are both a safe haven for her to channel a love for homemade pasta, fennel and everything else in between. You can contact Jess at editorial@ladbible.com.