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​Huge Octopus Launches Itself Onto Diver In Sea Of Japan

​Huge Octopus Launches Itself Onto Diver In Sea Of Japan

A diver in the Sea of Japan recently had a bit of a sketchy moment with an octopus - which launched itself onto the unsuspecting human.

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In the footage, which was captured near the Gamov Peninsula on 3 June, you can see the huge octopus swim up to the diver and try to sucker itself onto their lower back.

Swimming off a few inches, it then relaunches itself onto their right knee and leg - this time managing to hold on for a little longer.

The creature then tries to attach itself to the diver's right foot, wrapping its long tentacle around the flipper.

The octopus tried attaching itself to the diver's foot. Credit: Newsflare
The octopus tried attaching itself to the diver's foot. Credit: Newsflare

Eventually though, after about 30 seconds, it gives up and swims off.

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Many octopuses have a range of tactics when it comes to self-defence or fending off would-be attackers.

As National Geographic explains, the common octopus' first line of defence is its ability to camouflage itself and hide in plain sight.

"Using a network of pigment cells and specialised muscles in its skin, this invertebrate can almost instantaneously match the colours, patterns, and even textures of its surroundings," the website explains.

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"Predators such as sharks, eels, and dolphins swim by without even noticing it."

An octopus can also release a cloud of black ink to obscure an attacker's view. The ink also apparently contains a substance that 'dulls a predator's sense of smell'.

Then there's the fact that octopuses are both fast swimmers and agile enough to squeeze through any hole that isn't smaller than their beaks - the only hard part of their bodies.

If all else fails, an octopus can even lose an arm to escape a predator's hold, and can simply re-grow it with no permanent damage.

While the octopus in the Sea of Japan ended up giving up and swimming off, things still worked out a bit better than they did for this guy:

Connor Stapley filmed the incredible fight to the death between an massive octopus and a seal while out kayaking in New Zealand a couple of years ago.

"It went on for about 20 minutes, it was definitely one of the biggest octopuses I have ever seen," Connor said.

During the tussle, the octopus managed to launch itself away from the seal, but it's not enough. After 20 minutes the octopus is defeated.

The seal is then filmed ripping it apart by its tentacles. Yeeeeeesh.

Featured Image Credit: Newsflare

Topics: News, Animals, Octopus

Jess Hardiman

Jess is a journalist at LADbible who graduated from Manchester University with a degree in Film Studies, English Language and Linguistics - indecisiveness at its finest, right there. She also works for FOODbible and its sister page Seitanists, which are both a safe haven for her to channel a love for homemade pasta, fennel and everything else in between. You can contact Jess at [email protected]