Advert

Aviation Expert 'Confident' He Knows Where MH370 Plane Crash Site Is In 'Major Breakthrough'

Published 
| Last updated 

Aviation Expert 'Confident' He Knows Where MH370 Plane Crash Site Is In 'Major Breakthrough'

An aviation expert believes he has found where the MH370 crash site is after using revolutionary new tracking technology.  

It's been seven years and eight months since the Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, which was carrying 239 people, vanished into thin air as it travelled from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.  

Despite extensive search efforts ever since, the wreckage of the plane has never been found.  

A search in 2015. Credit: Alamy
A search in 2015. Credit: Alamy
Advert

However, British aerospace engineer Richard Godfrey now believes he knows where it could be – claiming the plane crashed into the Indian Ocean 1,993km west of Perth, and now lies 4,000m below the surface. 

In a new report released yesterday (Tuesday 30 November), Godfrey said he has been able to track the plane’s final movements using a system called Weak Signal Propagation

Speaking to 7 News, he described the technology as a ‘bunch of tripwires that work in every direction over the horizon to the other side of the globe’, and as aircraft fly through these so-called tripwires, the signal is disrupted.  

Godfrey said he used this new method along with data from the satellite communications system onboard MH370 to track the flight. 

Advert
Debris believed to belong to the missing Malaysia Airlines MH370. Credit: Alamy
Debris believed to belong to the missing Malaysia Airlines MH370. Credit: Alamy

“Together the two systems can be used to detect, identify and localise MH370 during its flight path into the Southern Indian Ocean,” he said in the report. 

Godfrey believes the aircraft crashed about a minute after the final satellite link-up at 8.19am, and that it now lies at the base of an underwater plateau known as Broken Ridge, which is filled with ravines and even has a volcano.  

7 News reports that the area was not part of the original search location defined by Australian Transport Safety Bureau in 2015, although it sits at the ‘northern part’ of the 2016 extended search area. 

Advert

Another search effort in 2018 – which was run by Ocean Infinity – missed the area by just 28km, the outlet adds. 

Godfrey told 7 News’ Sunrise that he feels ‘very confident’ he has located the plane.  

Credit: Seven Network
Credit: Seven Network

“We have quite a lot of data from the satellite, we have oceanography, drift analysis, we have the performance data from Boeing, and now this new technology," he said. 

Advert

“All four align with one particular point in the Indian Ocean.” 

Godfrey said he thinks the crash was a ‘hijacking’ and an ‘act of terrorism’ by pilot Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah, who ‘decided to divert his aircraft and make it disappear in one of the remotest places in the world’. 

Geoffrey Thomas, aviation editor of The West Australian, hailed the new report as a ‘huge breakthrough’, and that it is likely a new search will now be launched. 

Advert

“What’s very interesting about it is the location identified by Richard Godfrey is extremely close to the location identified by UWA,” he told Sunrise

“It really is more evidence that where UWA said this airplane is, that’s where we have to have another good, hard look.” 

 

Featured Image Credit: Seven Network

Topics: News, World News

Jess Hardiman
More like this
Advert
Advert
Advert

Chosen for YouChosen for You

News

All Covid Restrictions Apart From Two Could Be Scrapped Within Days

7 hours ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

News

David Beckham Sparks Debate Again After Kissing Daughter Harper

6 hours ago