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Australian Animal Shelters Notice Spike In Numbers As Isolation Ends

Australian Animal Shelters Notice Spike In Numbers As Isolation Ends

Self-isolation is quickly becoming a thing of the past in many states and territories across Australia as the coronavirus threat weakens.

People are flocking to bars, restaurants, pubs, outdoor events and to each other's homes and the idea of spending time indoors locked away from everyone is almost a distant memory for some.

However, this post-pandemic Australia has also apparently seen a spike in the number of animals turning up at shelters.

Many people flocked to adoption centres, pounds and shelters to pick up a furry friend during isolation, with many thinking lockdown was the perfect time to get that pet they always wanted.

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Credit: PxHere
Credit: PxHere

But it seems the sudden return to the office and social scenarios is causing concern.

Sydney Dogs and Cats Home veterinarian Renae Jackson said while they had seen record levels of adoptions over the past few months, the number of dogs in their shelter had doubled.

She told 7News: "We're thinking this is more to do with people going back to work, not being with their animals as much and the animals escaping.

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"We're not actually seeing people dumping animals that we know of, but we are certainly seeing a lot of extra stray dogs."

People who picked up a furry friend during isolation who didn't have a pet before will probably be unaccustomed to pet ownership in the post-pandemic Australia. The animal need to be let out and taken on walks and that can be hard now that you're at the office and then nipping to social drinks afterwards or hitting the gym.

Credit: Spot Us (Flickr)
Credit: Spot Us (Flickr)

The Herald Sun says there have been a noticeable uptick in animal surrenders at shelters elsewhere in the country as isolation ends.

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However, the RSPCA is hopeful those numbers are just a small minority and the rate of adoptions will hold strong.

Media Liaison Kieran Watson told News Corp: "There is always the chance that some animals might be returned once people's lives return to relative normality, but we are confident in our application process that we hope to limit any returns.

"We had no shortage of applicants wanting to adopt a pet so it was not about finding the first home or any home but the right home for each animal."

The biggest reason at the moment for people surrendering their pets is financial hardship, which is hardly surprising considering the number of people who have become unemployed or had their pay reduced during the pandemic.

Featured Image Credit: Pixabay

Topics: News, Animals, Australia

Stewart Perrie

Stewart Perrie is a Trending Journalist at LADbible. His first job was as a newsreader and journalist at the award winning Sydney radio station, Macquarie Radio. He was solely responsible for the content broadcast on multiple stations across Australia when the MH17, Germanwings and AirAsia disasters unfolded. Stewart has covered the conflict in Syria for LADbible, interviewing a doctor on the front line, and has contributed to the hugely successful UOKM8 campaign.