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Enormous Saltwater Crocodile Races Boat In Far North Queensland

Enormous Saltwater Crocodile Races Boat In Far North Queensland

Fisherman Robert Dunn found himself in a terrifying race with an enormous saltwater crocodile - with the giant reptile leaping out of the water like a dolphin. You can watch the incredible footage below:

Dunn saw the croc speeding alongside his boat while he was heading out to check his crab pots.

"He was gaffing it for that deep water," Dunn told the Cairns Post of the crocodile, which he filmed on the Bloomfield River, about 35km north of Cape Tribulation in Tropical North Queensland.

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"He was sizing me up and I thought he was going to go for the tinny, but lucky he didn't."

He continued: "I saw it in the shallows and was underneath the tinny for a while.

"He came up with this growl and locked eyes with me. I was only in a 3.5 tinny and he cruised right next to me. It was interesting.

Robert captured the croc leaping out of the water like a dolphin. Credit: Robert Dunn via Storyful
Robert captured the croc leaping out of the water like a dolphin. Credit: Robert Dunn via Storyful
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"It went down then came up again and I got my phone out and managed to get a bit of footage."

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Robert estimates the croc was about 4.5 metres long based on the size of his boat, although saltwater crocodiles can grow up to 7 metres long. They are one of the world's most enduring species, having outlasted dinosaurs by some 65 million years.

They can swim up to 29 km per hour and are the largest living reptile.

This particular beast has earned the nickname Tommy the Tank from locals, after getting a reputation for eating dogs in the area. Yikes!

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Saltwater crocodiles can swim up to 29 km per hour. Credit: PA
Saltwater crocodiles can swim up to 29 km per hour. Credit: PA

Crocodile expert David White told the Cairns Post that the way Tommy pursued Robert's boat is unusual behaviour for a crocodile.

He said: "I have seen a big male make a huge wake like that and swim high after another male but not as fast as this.

"Perhaps there was another male around or else just full of testosterone and angry. I certainly wouldn't have been so calm."

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Whatever riled up Tommy, it's impressive Robert managed to hold his nerve and capture the impressive footage.

Featured Image Credit: Robert Dunn via Storyful

Topics: crocodile, Animals, Australia