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Victoria Set To Ban Public Displays Of Swastikas And Other Nazi Symbols

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Victoria Set To Ban Public Displays Of Swastikas And Other Nazi Symbols

A Victorian parliamentary committee has recommended a ban on the public display of swastikas and other Nazi symbols in the state.

Victoria has been plagued by several incidents that captured national attention for the seemingly proud wearing and displaying of Nazi symbols.

Premier Daniel Andrews admitted back in 2019 that there was a 'deficiency' in the law.

"There's no place for those views, there's no place for those symbols, there's no place for those attitude and conduct in a modern Victoria," he said.

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In that year, authorities were powerless to stop a neo-Nazi festival from going ahead and around 40 men who gathered in the Grampians before Australia Day this year weren't arrested for holding a KKK-style ritual.

There have also been other instances where people have worn Nazi regalia or flown swastika flags in their home.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

The Victorian Parliament's Legal and Social Issues Committee has been looking into what options are legally available to help ensure this never happens again.

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They have decided it is time to change the state's racial vilification laws and ensure Nazi symbols and insignia from Germany's Third Reich be hidden from public view.

"The committee believes it is important to send a clear message to the community that Nazi symbolism is not acceptable in any form and has wide-ranging, negative societal impacts," the inquiry's report read.

"It recommends that the Victorian government establish a criminal offence that prohibits the display of symbols of Nazi ideology, including the Nazi swastika, with considered exceptions to the law.

"This would allow Victoria Police to immediately remove Nazi symbols that are on deliberate display to vilify targeted communities."

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The state government is expected to follow the committee's recommendation

Anti-Defamation Commission chair Dvir Abramovich told SBS the decision to ban Nazi symbols from Victoria shows its citizens that 'enough is enough'.

"This is a thunderous day for the history books that will not be denied, and a resounding defeat of those agents of evil who seek to keep Hitler's legacy alive," he said.

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: Australia

Stewart Perrie
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