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'Animal Lover' Kills And Hunts Meat For Her Family

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'Animal Lover' Kills And Hunts Meat For Her Family

A woman who claims to be an 'animal lover' has appeared on This Morning today, explaining why she hunts and kills game to feed her family.

Speaking on the show, Rachel Carrie, 35, from Yorkshire, explained that she was a vegetarian when she was younger, but now she hunts and kills meat, believing it to be more ethical than buying meat from supermarkets.

Having been taught how to hunt by her dad, she says she only does so on the land behind her home, where she says she has permission.

Credit: Rachel Carrie / Matt Austin
Credit: Rachel Carrie / Matt Austin
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She's gone and got herself a pretty big Instagram following, and was questioned by the show's hosts about being the 'glamorous face of hunting'.

"I wouldn't say I'm the glamorous face of hunting," Rachel said. "There are thousands of people doing what I do."

She revealed that she has been killing animals since she was just eight years old, starting with killing and skinning rabbits.

"I used to skin, butcher them and prepare them for Mum's rabbit stew," she continued. "The interesting thing was, I was a vegetarian at this point but would happily eat Mum's rabbit stew."

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Now, she hunts and kills a variety of animals including pigeons, wild boar and deer.

Carrie, who is an environmental impact assessor, said she feels no qualms shooting deer on cruelty or environmental grounds.

Credit: Rachel Carrie / Matt Austin
Credit: Rachel Carrie / Matt Austin

She has said she will present her case next Sunday in a debate at The Game Fair, a gathering of hunters and shooters at Hatfield House, Hertfordshire.

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Speaking to The Times, she said: "You place a clean shot straight through the heart and that animal never knew you were there.

"It didn't suffer, it wasn't scared. It didn't get transported miles and miles to an abattoir."

She also said the amount of food thrown away by the family has decreased, explaining: "When you spend all day finding your food, the last thing you want to do is waste any of it."

When questioned about the possibility of putting animals in extreme pain though missed shots, she said: "You would not take the shot if you weren't 100% certain.

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"By being a hunter you can still get the nutritional benefits of meat but without the guilt. You do not have the animal welfare issues."

Featured Image Credit: Rachel Carrie / Matt Austin

Topics: uk news, Animals

Amelia Ward
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