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Arctic Records Hottest Temperature Ever As Siberian Town Reaches 100.4°F

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Arctic Records Hottest Temperature Ever As Siberian Town Reaches 100.4°F

The Arctic has recorded its hottest temperature ever, with a town in Siberia reaching 100.4°F (38°C) - 32 degrees above its normal high.

Temperatures shot up in the small town of Verkhoyansk (67.5°N latitude), which sits 3,000 miles east of Moscow, as Siberia continues its summer heatwave.

If the town's 100.4°F is verified, it's likely to go down in history as the hottest temperature ever recorded in Siberia - and also the hottest temperature recorded north of the Arctic Circle, CBS reports.

The current record for hottest Arctic temperature is currently held by Prospect Creek, Alaska, which recorded 100°F (38°C) back in 1915.

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The city of Caribou, Maine, also tied an all-time record at 96°F on Friday, and was well into the 90s the following day. To put this into perspective, the city of Miami in Florida has only reached 100°F once since the city began keeping temperature records in 1896.

Miami, Florida. Credit: PA
Miami, Florida. Credit: PA

CBS weatherman Jeff Beradelli said on Twitter that the news was 'alarming', writing: "Likely the hottest temperature ever recorded in the Arctic happened today.

"What's happening in Siberia this year is nothing short of remarkable. For perspective, Miami has only reached 100F (38C) once on record."

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In another tweet, Beradelli added: "The reason Miami has only reached 100 once is because it's near the ocean.

"So this is not an apples to apples comparison, because land heats faster than water, and the sea breeze cools Miami down, but it is an interesting fact that always seems hard to believe."


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Verkhoyansk, which has a population of just 1,000 people, is also the coldest place on Earth, having recorded a record low temperature of -90.04°F (-67.8°C).

The town experiences extreme weather due to its position in Russia, where it is surrounded by land that heats and cools faster than water does.

Featured Image Credit: Flickr/Maarten Takens

Topics: Weather, World News, News

Jess Hardiman
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