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BBC Newsreader Yalda Hakim Receives Call From Taliban Live On Air

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BBC Newsreader Yalda Hakim Receives Call From Taliban Live On Air

This is the moment a BBC newsreader had to cut an interview short to speak to a Taliban spokesperson live on air:

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Journalist Yalda Hakim received a phone call from Suhail Shaheen to discuss the Taliban's future plans in Afghanistan after weeks of conflict.

Upon getting the correspondence, Ms Hakim scrambled around to ensure viewers could hear what Mr Shaheen was saying and asked 'can our viewers hear that?' as she looked directly into the camera.

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She went on to put some on the spot questions to him and he explained that the Taliban are 'servants of the people'.

He said: "We assure the people in Afghanistan, particularly in the city of Kabul, that their properties, their lives are safe.

"There will be no revenge on anyone."

Suhail Shaheen, Afghan Taliban spokesman and a member of the negotiation team. Credit: Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP/Shutterstock
Suhail Shaheen, Afghan Taliban spokesman and a member of the negotiation team. Credit: Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP/Shutterstock
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Mr Shaheen called for a 'peaceful transfer of power' and said civilians would not be harmed, saying: "What I'm saying is the policy, I explained our policy to you, clearly, and this policy will be implemented."

According to the spokesperson, fighters who have been caught up in acts of violence will be punished by the courts.

He said: "Over the next few days, we want a peaceful transfer of power."

He added: "Secondly, people will be able to resume their normal [lives].

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"Thirdly, there is no revenge on all those who are working with the Kabul administration or with the foreign forces.

"We want all embassies to continue their work, there will be no risk to diplomats or to anyone. All should continue as if they were continuing in the past."

Credit: BBC News
Credit: BBC News

British troops are racing against the clock to get remaining UK nationals and their local allies out of Afghanistan following the dramatic fall of the country's Western-backed government.

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Lead elements of 16 Air Assault Brigade were working with US forces to secure Kabul airport to ensure flights can continue as Afghans and foreigners alike scramble to leave.

Defence Secretary Ben Wallace said the Government was aiming to fly out a further 1,500 people over the next 24 to 36 hours or slightly longer.

Kabul airport has so far not come under attack, but there are fears that could change quickly with Taliban insurgents now effectively in control of the capital.

Triumphal fighters were pictured in the presidential palace abandoned by President Ashraf Ghani, who fled the country while his forces gave up the city without a fight.

Featured Image Credit: BBC News

Topics: World News, News, BBC, afghanistan, taliban

Rebecca Shepherd
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