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Car Goes Up In Flames After Driver Uses Hand Sanitiser While Smoking

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Car Goes Up In Flames After Driver Uses Hand Sanitiser While Smoking

A motorist was left with burns when his car went up flames after he used hand sanitiser while smoking a cigarette.

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The unusual incident happened in Rockville in Maryland, US, when the driver was smoking a cigarette and then began to use hand sanitiser.

The sanitiser ignited and the whole car ended up completely engulfed in flames.

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Fortunately, the driver only received minor burns and was taken to hospital.

In a post on Twitter, Pete Piringer, a spokesperson for The Montgomery County Fire and Rescue Service said: "Vehicle fire; cause, driver using hand sanitiser & smoking a cigarette, which is a bad combo in unventilated area like a car; total loss."

In a second post he wrote: "Hand sanitiser & lighted cigarette start fire in an occupied car. Driver was able to escape the vehicle while onlookers called 911. The patient suffered from NLT 1st & 2nd degree burns on his hands & inner thighs & transported to hospital."

Credit: Twitter/@mcfrsPIO
Credit: Twitter/@mcfrsPIO
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Images show the inside of the car totally burnt out by the fire, which firefighters were eventually able to put out.

Last May, a US fire department issued a warning to motorists about leaving hand sanitiser in their vehicles during hot weather.

The Western Lakes Fire District in Wisconsin, United States, shared a photo on Facebook showing a burned-out car door, explaining how hand-sanitiser tends to be 'alcohol-based' and is therefore highly flammable.

The post read: "Let's start today with a little education!

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"We've chatted in the past about clear water bottles being kept in your vehicle when the weather is warm.

Credit: Twitter/@mcfrsPIO
Credit: Twitter/@mcfrsPIO

"That still holds true and so does hand sanitiser! By its nature, most hand sanitiser is alcohol-based and therefore flammable.

"Keeping it in your car during hot weather, exposing it to sun causing magnification of light through the bottle - and particularly being next to open flame while smoking in vehicles or grilling while enjoying this weekend - can lead to disaster.

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"Please respect the possibilities and be fire safe."

While over on this side of the pond, the NHS released a similar warning in June.

A notice issued by the NHS property services read: "This quick share is to alert all colleagues to the potential fire risk in vehicles, caused by alcohol-based hand sanitiser.

Credit: Twitter/@mcfrsPIO
Credit: Twitter/@mcfrsPIO
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"We have received a number of reports of hand sanitiser being the cause of fires when left in vehicles in the hot weather the UK is currently experiencing."

The notice continued: "These vapours are reaching their 'flashpoint' and then ignite in normal air conditions, setting fire to flammable components within the car.

"Remove all alcohol-based hand sanitiser products from vehicles when they are not occupied, do not leave hand sanitiser in unattended vehicles."

Featured Image Credit: Twitter/@mcfrsPIO

Topics: US News

Claire Reid
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