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Drinking Two Fizzy Drinks A Week 'Increases Risk Of Diabetes And Stroke' Study Finds

Drinking Two Fizzy Drinks A Week 'Increases Risk Of Diabetes And Stroke' Study Finds

We've long known that pretty much everything we enjoy eating and drinking is bad for us, particularly if we over indulge in it.

And while we all know that drinking loads of fizzy drinks isn't going to do you any favours, you might be surprised to learn how little of the sugary stuff it actually takes to have a negative impact on your health.

New research has found that drinking just two cans of fizzy drink a week is enough to increase your risk of Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and stroke.

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Fizzy drinks are often crammed full of sugar. Credit: PA

According to the study, just one can of sugary soft drink a week is enough to raise blood pressure, while drinking as few as two servings in a week can lead to an increased chance of developing diabetes.

Researchers from Stellenbosch University in South Africa, say that the 'energy dense' drinks are associated with excessive calorie intake and weight gain.

They evaluated 36 studies of people who were drinking more than five sugar-sweetened drinks a week and found that most of the studies supported a link between drinking fizzy drinks and a heightened risk of Type 2 diabetes.

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The World Health Organisation estimates that cardiometabolic conditions, including diabetes, are responsible for 19 million deaths a year.

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Lead author Prof Faadiel Essop said: "Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption is steadily rising among all age groups worldwide.

The researchers found as little as two sugar-sweetened drinks a week can increase your risk of Type 2 diabetes. Credit: PA

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"Our analysis revealed that most epidemiological studies strongly show that frequent intake of these beverages contributes to the onset of the metabolic syndrome, diabetes and hypertension.

"Excess sugar consumption has surfaced as one of the most prominent global dietary changes during the past few decades and is considered a primary driver of cardiometabolic diseases onset.

Credit: PA

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"The findings demonstrate there is a clear need for public education about the harmful effects of excess consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages."

So, just another thing to add to the list of stuff that tastes good but will end up killing you.

Featured Image Credit: Creative Commons

Topics: Food, Sugar

Claire Reid

Claire is a journalist at LADbible who, after dossing around for a few years, went to Liverpool John Moores University. She graduated with a degree in Journalism and a whole load of debt. When not writing words in exchange for money she is usually at home watching serial killer documentaries surrounded by cats. You can contact Claire at [email protected]