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Greens Senator Wants To Make Cat Calling Illegal

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Greens Senator Wants To Make Cat Calling Illegal

Catcalling has been around for decades and either comes in the form of a whistle or a derogatory comment.

Whether it still happens in Australia is up for debate but one political party wants to make sure that if it does then they'll face the full brunt of the law.

Greens Senator Larissa Waters would like to allow authorities to issue on the spot fines for people who make sexually charged comments on the street.

Credit: Larissa Waters/Facebook
Credit: Larissa Waters/Facebook
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She said a similar law in France has proven effective and thinks it should be introduced here.

Ms Waters has told 10 Daily: "It sends a message that street harassment isn't acceptable, and that it's behaviour that is being discouraged.

"The French laws are working...it's a message we think is effective, not just because of the fine but as society saying this isn't how you treat women.

"We think the concept is sound, and warrants to see whether it could work in Australia...it deserves consideration."

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In France, you can cop a fine of $143 to $1190 - which is a hefty sum for some avoidable remarks.

The new legislation outlaws sexual or sexist comments (including cat calling), and degrading, intimidating or hostile behaviour. It will also expand the criminal definition of child rape and will extend the statue of limitations for sex crimes.

It was backed by 90 percent of the French public, an IFOP poll found.

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Gender Equality Minister and architect of the new legislation, Marlene Schiappa, spoke to Europe 1 Radio about the new law, saying: "Harassment in the street has previously not been punished. From now on, It will be.

Image result for catcalling simpsonsImage result for catcalling simpsons

A few months after the law was introduced, a drunk man on a bus near Paris was the first to be fined after calling a woman a 'whore' and commented on her 'big breasts'.

It's unclear how Ms Waters would like a similar law to be introduced in Australia but she's keen to see something brought into legislation to protect women in public.

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"Women deserve to be safe. We're being killed in our homes, on the street, and not enough is being done to keep us safe ... if we can stamp out that behaviour that starts as a catcall and ends in a women dying, it's a worthwhile investment," she said.

Featured Image Credit: Tosh.0/Comedy Channel

Topics: Australia News, News, Australia, politics

Stewart Perrie
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