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Last Month Was World's Hottest November Since Records Began

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Last Month Was World's Hottest November Since Records Began

Last month was the hottest November globally since records began, according to the Copernicus Climate Change Service (CS3).

Its analysis showed that the month was almost 0.8°C warmer than a typical November, using the 30-year reference period of 1981 to 2010.

It was also more than 0.1°C warmer than the previous warmest Novembers, which were recorded in 2016 and 2019.

Last month was the hottest November globally since records began. Credit: PA
Last month was the hottest November globally since records began. Credit: PA
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The temperatures were particularly high in Europe, which recorded its joint second warmest November with 2009, 0.2°C below the record November in 2015.

Across September, October and November, temperatures in Europe were the warmest on record, 1.9°C above the average and 0.4°C higher than the average temperature in the previous hottest autumn in 2006.

This year could yet prove to be the hottest ever, as it is currently running neck and neck with current record-holder 2016.

But of course, while the idea of slightly warmer weather might sound quite agreeable to a lot of us, it can have a disastrous impact on our planet.

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Sea ice levels in the Arctic are the second-lowest they've been since satellite observations began in 1979, increasing the risk of flooding in coastal areas; and this is just one of the countless dangers posed by climate change.

Warmer autumns may be pleasant, but the trend is cause for alarm. Credit: PA
Warmer autumns may be pleasant, but the trend is cause for alarm. Credit: PA

Carlo Buontempo, director of CS3, said: "Globally, November was an exceptionally warm month compared to other Novembers, and temperatures in the Arctic and northern Siberia remained consistently high, with sea ice at its second lowest extent.

"This trend is concerning and highlights the importance of comprehensive monitoring of the Arctic, as it is warming faster than the rest of the world.

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"These records are consistent with the long-term warming trend of the global climate.

"All policy-makers who prioritise mitigating climate risks, should see these records as alarm bells and consider more seriously than ever how to best comply with the international commitments set out in the 2015 Paris Agreement."

The Paris Agreement's central aim is to unify nations in a global effort to keep the temperature rise this century well below 2°C more than pre-industrial levels, with an aim of keeping the increase under 1.5°C.

Donald Trump announced in 2017 that the US would withdraw from the agreement, but Joe Biden has now said the country will re-join after he takes office in January.

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According to The Guardian, Bill Hare, CEO of Climate Analytics, said: "This looks like an historic tipping point: with Biden's election, China, the US, the EU, Japan, South Korea - two-thirds of the world economy and over 50 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions - have net zero greenhouse gas emissions by mid-century commitments.

"These commitments are very close, if not within, 1.5°C-consistent pathways for this set of countries and for the first time ever puts the Paris agreement's 1.5°C limit within striking distance."

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: Weather, World News

Jake Massey
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