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Man Selling Catalytic Converter On Facebook Forgets To Hide Meth

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Man Selling Catalytic Converter On Facebook Forgets To Hide Meth

A US man who was flogging a catalytic converter online was arrested by police after he accidentally shared a photo of a stash of drugs in the background of one of his photos.

James Kertz, from Missouri, shared a photo of the catalytic converter for sale on Facebook Marketplace last Wednesday, but it appears the 38-year-old forgot to check the image before he uploaded it because in the background a large bag of meth and other drug paraphernalia, including a syringe, could quite clearly be seen.

Credit: Stone County Sheriff's Office
Credit: Stone County Sheriff's Office

Whoops.

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Stone County Sheriff Doug Rader told Fox News the police were tipped off about the drugs shortly after the advert was posted on Facebook.

He said: "Apparently he must have been under the influence because in the background of his picture he posted, he left his large bag of meth and syringe on the coffee table.

"Take note, if you are selling items on social media, make sure your drugs are not in the background!"

Officers then obtained a warrant and searched Kertz home where they found 48 grams of meth and a handgun he wasn't legally allowed to own.

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Sheriff Rader added: "We have now provided him a new place to stay.

"Sorry folks, his catalytic converters are not for sale right now."

Kertz has been held at Stone County without bond and is charged with possessing a controlled substance.

He has prior convictions for possession of a controlled substance, resisting arrest, domestic assault and endangering the welfare of a child.

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Credit: Stone County Sheriff's Office
Credit: Stone County Sheriff's Office

Bizarrely this isn't the first time social media has led to an arrest - back in July two men in Florida were charged with armed robbery after they talked about their crimes on Facebook.

Manatee County Sheriff's Office says Patrick Smith, 23, and Darquez Manning, 22, had held online conversations before and after the robbery.

Officials say a stream of messages were shared between Manning and Smith on 27 June and the early hours of 28 June.

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It was alleged the men discussed robbing the victims just hours before the crime took place.

And then at 1am, three hours after the robbery, Manning sent Smith a message saying 'investigating', followed by another which read: "They ova in the area ... looking."

The final message was sent from Manning to Smith reminding him to delete his messages.

But it seems as though he didn't follow that particular instruction.

Featured Image Credit: Stone County Sheriff's Office

Topics: US News, crime

Claire Reid
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