Advert

Exhibition Of Clothes Worn By Rape Survivors Proves That Clothing Doesn't Incite Attacks

Published 
| Last updated 

Exhibition Of Clothes Worn By Rape Survivors Proves That Clothing Doesn't Incite Attacks

An exhibition depicting the clothing worn by the survivors of rape has been opened in Brussels.

A joint venture between The University of Kansas and the municipal authorities of Molenbeek, the exhibition dispels the myth that certain clothing incites rape.

'What Were You Wearing?', at the Centre Communautaire Maritime (CCM) in Brussels, is described as a 'visual exhibition that highlights that a sexual assault never occurs because of what a person wears, but because one person attacks another'.

Credit: CCM
Credit: CCM
Advert

Jen Brockman, director of the University of Kansas' Sexual Assault Prevention and Education Centre, told the Chicago Tribune: "We want people to be able to see themselves reflected in the installation, in the description, in the outfits.

"That someone's clothing causes sexual violence is false."

Host to 18 replicated pieces of clothing from real victims of rape, the exhibition tells the story behind each garment.

Items on display include pyjamas, a child's 'My Little Pony' t-shirt and a policed officer's uniform.

Advert
Credit: CCM
Credit: CCM

With reference to the 'My Little Pony' shirt, Lieshbeth Kennes, a training and counselling employee of victim support group CAW, told VRT1 Radio: "The exhibition is a harsh reality; most victims of rape still know what they were wearing at the time."

"What you immediately notice when you walk around here is they are all very normal pieces that everyone would wear."

Credit: CCM
Credit: CCM
Advert

In 2014, Twitter user Christine Fox asked the question 'What were you wearing when you were assaulted?', to which she was flooded responses off thousands of men and women. This kickstarted a campaign and the hashtag of 'what were you wearing?' The creation of the Kansas University and Brussels exhibition soon followed suit.

The Prevention Service of Molenbeek said that the exhibit creates a 'tangible response to one of our most pervasive rape culture myths' because 'the belief that clothing or what someone what wearing 'causes' rape is extremely damaging for survivors'.

A police uniform is part of the exhibition (Credit: CCM)
A police uniform is part of the exhibition (Credit: CCM)

The exhibition, which can be seen at the community centre of Molenbeek in Brussels, is open from January 8 to 20.

Advert

Words by Jade Culver

Featured Image Credit: CCM

Topics: Clothing, World News, News

Sorry, this content isn't available right now.

Advert
Advert
Advert

Chosen for YouChosen for You

News

Face Masks To Be Compulsory From Tuesday In England

18 hours ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

News

Doctor Who Discovered Omicron Variant Says Symptoms 'Extremely Mild'

14 hours ago