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Pauline Hanson Has Flown To Northern Territory To Climb Uluru

Pauline Hanson Has Flown To Northern Territory To Climb Uluru

One Nation leader Pauline Hanson has made her views on Uluru, also known as Ayres Rock, pretty clear.

While local Aboriginal groups have pleaded with people not to climb their sacred rock, tourists have flocked in their droves to do exactly that - and Ms Hanson reckons that's their right.

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In a bid to further that perspective, the Aussie politician has flown to the Northern Territory to talk with Aboriginal elders and climb the rock.

"The Anangu Mayatja Council of Elders have invited me to the Rock for discussions about their future following my calls for the climb to remain open," Ms Hanson wrote on Facebook.

"I arrived yesterday afternoon and held talks with the two sons of Paddy Uluru who was the traditional owner and other family members.

"Today I will meet with around 15 of their Anangu Mayatja Council of Elders and attempt to climb the Rock if the wind has dropped off."

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Pauline Hanson has long held the belief that while it's sacred to the traditional owners of Australia, it's there to be climbed and no one is going to stop her doing that.

But time is running out for people to do that, with the rock being officially closed to tourists from October 26.

No doubt that's something Ms Hanson wants changed.

She previously told Channel 9's The Today Show that it's a money making machine for the area.

"We've got nearly 400 people employed there; 38 percent are Aboriginal, they're employed there, and Torres Strait Islanders," she told the host.

"The fact is, it's money making, it's giving jobs to the Indigenous community, you get four to five thousand tourists a year that want to go there and climb the rock.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

"It's no different to saying we're going to close down Bondi Beach because there are some people there that have drowned. How ridiculous is that! This is an iconic site for all Australians.

"I can't see the cultural sensitivity when people have been climbing the rock all these years and now all of a sudden they want to shut it down? No, I just don't get it, I really don't get it.

"And how are they going to pay back the Australian tax payer?"

It's not really hard to understand the concern around climbing Uluru. The massive sandstone rock formation in the Northern Territory is important to the Pitjantjatjara Anangu people and forms part of their understanding of how the world was created.

Featured Image Credit: Pauline Hanson/Facebook

Topics: News, Australia, politics

Stewart Perrie

Stewart Perrie is a Trending Journalist at LADbible. His first job was as a newsreader and journalist at the award winning Sydney radio station, Macquarie Radio. He was solely responsible for the content broadcast on multiple stations across Australia when the MH17, Germanwings and AirAsia disasters unfolded. Stewart has covered the conflict in Syria for LADbible, interviewing a doctor on the front line, and has contributed to the hugely successful UOKM8 campaign.

 

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