Advert

Raw Sewage Dumped Into Sea For 49 Hours Straight

Published 

Raw Sewage Dumped Into Sea For 49 Hours Straight

Raw sewage has reportedly been dumped into the sea for 49 hours straight in Langstone Harbour, Hampshire. Watch footage below:

Loading…

Photographer Chris Pearsall captured the footage and told the BBC that 'it needs to stop'.

The pipe, also known as an outfall, is seven feet wide and sewage poured out of it for 49 hours, the BBC reported.

Advert

Chris explained: "I launched my go[pro] from 100 metres over there and once I was flying over the top looking at the screen, I just couldn't believe what I was seeing.

"The general reaction from people on social media who have seen the film now - they really are astonished at quite how much of this is happening.

"And it's happening right along our coastline and quite similarly it needs to stop."

Credit: Chris Pearsall Photography
Credit: Chris Pearsall Photography
Advert

As per Huff Post, Keith Davis of the Environment Agency's water-quality department said: "We've got 15,000 storm overflows and the majority are on the combined sewer network with about 100,000 km of combined sewer in England alone."

Last July, the Guardian reported that raw sewage was pumped into English rivers through storm overflow pipes more than 200,000 times in 2019.

The Environment Agency revealed in March this year that 3.1 million hours of human effluent flowed into English waters across 400,000 in 2020.

Surfers Against Sewage's chief executive Hugo Tagholm also pointed out: "All of our waterways are connected.

Advert

"It's one cycle: what goes into our rivers ends up in our oceans."

In terms of pollution, thousands of sea creatures are washing up dead on UK beaches in the North East and it is believed that there is a potential link.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

Piles of dead crabs, lobsters and other fish have been found between beaches between Marske and Saltburn in Teesside.

Advert

An Environmental agency spokesman told TeessideLive on Monday they are considering whether a pollution incident might be to blame.

They said: "We are working with partners at the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture and North Eastern Inshore Fisheries Conservation Authority to investigate why hundreds of dead crabs have washed up along the shore in the Tees Estuary and neighbouring beaches.

"Samples of water, sediment, mussel and crab have been collected and are being sent to our labs for analysis, to consider whether a pollution incident could have contributed to the deaths of the animals.

"We have also shared samples with CEFAS labs for disease analysis."

Featured Image Credit: Chris Pearsall Photography

Topics: Pollution

Anish Vij
More like this
Advert
Advert
Advert

Chosen for YouChosen for You

News

Pub Named After Mythical Black Dog Renamed To Be 'Anti-Racist'

8 hours ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

News

Ikea Shoppers And Staff Snowed In At Denmark Store

2 hours ago