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Royal National Lifeboat Institution Issue Warning Over 'Storm Loch Ness' Facebook Event

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Royal National Lifeboat Institution Issue Warning Over 'Storm Loch Ness' Facebook Event

With the 'Storm Area 51' event in full swing, we nearly missed the mass search for the Loch Ness Monster which went viral on social media and has caused concerns when it comes to the Royal National Lifeboat Institution.

The Facebook event has been set up for 21 September and already around 18,000 have indicated that they will be 'going' with 38,000 showing their interest.

John Haig at Loch Ness, as Nessie hunters were left disappointed when 'remains' turned out to be a 1970s film prop. Credit: PA
John Haig at Loch Ness, as Nessie hunters were left disappointed when 'remains' turned out to be a 1970s film prop. Credit: PA

Details for the search party are pretty sparse at the moment but the organisers have wrote: "The time is now for us to find dat big boi." Sounds promising.

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Of course the 'big boi' they're referring to is the Loch Ness Monster - the 'creature' anyone and everyone seems to spot when they're close to a patch of water in the Scottish Highlands.

We might not be taking this very seriously but the Loch Ness RNLI definitely are, as they've issued a warning about the dangers of the loch's deep water.

Loch Ness, south-west of Inverness, is the supposed habitat of the monster 'Nessie'. Credit: PA
Loch Ness, south-west of Inverness, is the supposed habitat of the monster 'Nessie'. Credit: PA

According to the BBC, the RNLI are concerned with the amount of people that could potentially head out on 21 September at 3am, saying that the volunteer crew could not match the resources being used by the US military to deal with the 'Storm Area 51' event.

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A spokesperson told the BBC: "With no US Army involved, Loch Ness looks a little less hazardous than storming Area 51, but here we have our own set of problems.

"Our Atlantic 85 lifeboat has an impressive survivor-carrying capacity, but even that will be stretched by the 'attendees' of this event."

The spokesperson went on to add some facts about Loch Ness - all 'jokes aside' - which reveal how dangerous it can be.

The Loch is two and a half times the height of Big Ben. Credit: PA
The Loch is two and a half times the height of Big Ben. Credit: PA
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The warning went on: "The Loch is 230m deep - that's nearly two and a half times the height of Big Ben.

"The water temperature is cold!! In fact, an average of 6 degrees centigrade all year round, meaning cold water shock and hypothermia are real dangers.

"Weather conditions and water state can deteriorate rapidly, going from flat calm to a large swell in minutes.

"There are very few areas on the shoreline where it is possible to make it up to a road. Waves are wind generated rather than tidal, so they behave differently to how users might expect.

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"Its fresh water is less buoyant than salt, meaning more effort is required to float/swim."

At the end of the post, they wrote: "Nessie 1 - 0 Bandwagon".

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: News, Scotland

Rebecca Shepherd
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