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See-Saw Through Border Wall Between USA And Mexico Wins Design Award

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See-Saw Through Border Wall Between USA And Mexico Wins Design Award

A see-saw placed through the border wall between the USA and Mexico has been awarded a prestigious design award run by London's Design Museum.

'Teeter-Totter Wall' is an interactive installation that was designed by architects Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello, and - as you can see - it consists of three bright pink see-saws - teeter-totters, if you're from across the pond - stuck between the rails of the steel border wall separating the United States from their closest southern neighbour, Mexico.

The installation allows children from both sides of the border to play with one another, with kids from El Paso in Texas on the US side and from the Anapra community in Juarez in Mexico able to access the see-saws.

It's a lovely way to turn a politically controversial and - frankly - ugly steel wall dividing the two countries into a way to bring people from both sides together.

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Credit: Design Museum
Credit: Design Museum

That's why it has been awarded the 2020 Beazley Design of the Year.

It is intended to draw attention to the intrinsic link between the two countries, and was created in collaboration with Juarez-based artistic collective Colectivo Chopeke.

Speaking to CNN in 2019, Rael said: "What you do on one side has an impact on the other, and that's what a seesaw is."

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Because of the divisive nature of the wall - both physically and figuratively - the project took a decade to come to fruition, and was only there for about 20 minutes.

That was long enough for it to go viral and get the message across, though.

Credit: Design Museum
Credit: Design Museum

On Instagram, Rael said that the whole event was 'filled with joy, excitement, and togetherness at the border wall.'

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Tim Marlow, the chief executive and director of the Design Museum said: "The Teeter-Totter Wall encouraged new ways of human connection.

"It remains an inventive and poignant reminder of how human beings can transcend the forces that seek to divide us."

The Beazley Prize is awarded in five more categories - architecture, digital, fashion, graphics, and product.

Amongst the other winners were the medical illustrators who devised the 3D rendering of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that we've all seen on the news this year.

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Alissa Eckert and Dan Higgins were the two illustrators behind it, working for the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Credit: Design Museum
Credit: Design Museum

Also, Impossible Burgers won an award for the Impossible Burger 2.0, which they claim is a juicier and tastier version of their original plant-based burger.

Assistant curator Maria McLintock said: "Designs of the Year this year feels more pertinent than ever.

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"From designs that create a kinder and healthier world, to those calling out and critiquing systems of oppression, we hope it serves as a time capsule of a shifting world."

Featured Image Credit: Design Museum

Topics: Art, Interesting, US News, Mexico, Politics

Tom Wood
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