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Britain's Cheapest Home Is Up For Auction At Just One Pound

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Britain's Cheapest Home Is Up For Auction At Just One Pound

A semi-detached, three-storey, home in Scotland, with great connections to the town centre and local amenities, is up for sale at just £1 ($1.36).

From the outside and you'll think you're getting a bargain, step inside though and you'll see that actually the lowly fee is in place for a reason.

It's like the worst nightmares at the beginning of an episode of Homes Under The Hammer (make sure you've read that legal pack), but has potential.

The property goes up for auction next month, but if you want to get involved you'll have to turn a blind eye to the collapsed ceilings, ripped-up floors and the rubbish-ridden rooms.

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Credit: Auction House Scotland

The abandoned home-to-be shows mattress lying covered in dirt, and even a piano in one of the rooms.

Once you've repaired the staircases that connect each floor, however, then work can certainly begin on the rest of the property.

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Credit: Auction House Scotland

Credit: Auction House Scotland

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Credit: Auction House Scotland

Auction House Scotland, the team behind the sale, describe the property as: "A unique opportunity for a builder/developer looking to return this building to its former glory."

It even has its own garage and a large garden - two strong points to consider when buying a house.

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Credit: Auction House Scotland

If you could contemplate skipping one of your Friday pints next week, by the time the auction comes around on October 5, you'll have saved up for a cheeky bid.

According to Rightmove, the average house price property in Kilmarnock was £111,044 ($150,835.51).

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At the other end of the scale in Scotland, part of an island is up for sale at £600,000.

The 98-hectare Fethaland croft, in North Roe, is on sale for £595,000 ($807,445), having been uninhabited for almost 80 years.

Part of the Shetland Islands, it's on the market alongside three smaller, tenanted crofts, one of which has a four-bedroom family home.

Credit: Cascade News

David Murray's family have owned the land for 150 years, but due to health reasons he's been forced to sell up. He described doing so as 'heartbreaking'.

Fethaland is popular with walkers and tourists, with human settlement dating back to prehistoric times. Even today it still features an Iron Age house and a Viking quarry.

Among its many features, it boasts opportunities to see killer whales, puffins and ospreys, and was once the biggest fishing station in the Shetland isles (before being abandoned in 1906).

Featured Image Credit: Auction House Scotland

Topics: Home, Scotland, auction

Michael Minay
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