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Changes To Parking Laws Could Soon Land You With A £70 Fine

Changes To Parking Laws Could Soon Land You With A £70 Fine

There are loads of random rules of the road that some of us didn't even know about - like the fact that if your licence plate is dirty of obstructed you could face a fine of up to £1,000 ($1,400), as it's a violation of the legal requirements.

Or that you could also get fined for throwing rubbish out the window of your car. Or that it's illegal both to smoke in the car with someone aged under 18 or to leave a parked car with the engine running.

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Well, soon there could be another addition to that slightly bizarre list, as, according to The Sun, the Department for Transport is currently considering a major overhaul of its national traffic laws - in a bid to de-clutter the streets.

If approved, the potential rules could allow local councils to make it illegal to park on the kerb - meaning you could get slapped with a fine of up to £70 for doing so.

The same rule already applies in London, where parking on the pavement has been illegal for well over 40 years, but the move would also bring the rest of England into line, too.

The Sun reports that these new laws would also see pavements become more accessible for both disabled people and anyone with pushchairs.

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Rule 22 of the Highway Code says: "You must not park partially or wholly on the pavement in London, and should not do so elsewhere unless signs permit it.

"Parking on the pavement can obstruct and seriously inconvenience pedestrians, people in wheelchairs or with visual impairments and people with prams or pushchairs."

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

Outside of London, people are allowed to partially park on the pavement as long as it's not causing an obstruction.

But last year, the Local Government Association pushed for councils across the UK to be able to adopt similar rules to the capital.

At the time, spokesman Martin Tett said: "Local authorities need this power to respond to concerns raised by their communities, for example if a street is becoming dangerously congested or pedestrians are being forced to step out into the street to get around parked vehicles.

"This is particularly dangerous for blind or partially sighted people and mums and dads with prams."

Speaking to the Times, Edmund King, president of the AA, revealed that he is opposed to a total ban.

He said: "There are some streets that are so narrow that if cars park on both sides it wouldn't allow emergency vehicles or bin lorries to get through.

"We would be concerned if there was a blanket ban because it is clearly possible in some areas to park on the pavement while still allowing room for pushchairs or people in wheelchairs to pass."

Something to bear in mind, or risk being £70 out of pocket...

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: Laws, uk news, Driving, Motoring, Kerb

Jess Hardiman

Jess is a journalist at LADbible who graduated from Manchester University with a degree in Film Studies, English Language and Linguistics - indecisiveness at its finest, right there. She also works for FOODbible and its sister page Seitanists, which are both a safe haven for her to channel a love for homemade pasta, fennel and everything else in between. You can contact Jess at [email protected]

 

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