Advert

Latest

The World's Last Ever Blockbuster Store Is On Airbnb
published atin an hour
Advert
Advert

Most Popular

Advert
News

Notorious Prisoner Charles Bronson Is Publishing A Book Of Poems

Notorious Prisoner Charles Bronson Is Publishing A Book Of Poems

The notorious prisoner Charles Bronson is publishing a book of poems.

The 67-year-old, who has been widely dubbed 'Britain's most violent prisoner', will reveal a different side of himself in the book In Words Inside and Out.

Charles Bronson is publishing a book of poems. Credit: Bad Boys Books
Charles Bronson is publishing a book of poems. Credit: Bad Boys Books

According to The Sun, an extract reads: "Broadmoor was a gas, Rampton a hole / Parkhurst was a trap, that's where I lost my soul," while another poem brands Soham killer Ian Huntley and Yorkshire Ripper Peter Sutcliffe 'a disgrace to the human race'.

Advert

The foreward reads: "Enjoy this book, if not . . . sling it on the fire."

According to The Sun, co-author Steve Wraith - who has been friends with Bronson for 20 years - said: "These poems show a different side to him."

Bronson - who was born Michael Peterson but now uses the name Charles Salvador - was first sentenced to seven years in jail for an armed robbery in 1974, however, this sentence was extended due to attacks on prisoners and guards.

He was briefly released before being convicted for planning another armed robbery and was handed a life sentence in 1999 after taking a prison teacher hostage for almost two days.

Advert

He was most recently in the headlines in 2018 when he was cleared of trying to cause grievous bodily harm to none other than the governor of the prison he was in.

More Like This

1 of 6
Notorious Prisoner Charles Bronson Thinks He'll Be Free By The Time He's 70
News

Notorious Prisoner Charles Bronson Thinks He'll Be Free By The Time He's 70

Bronson was acquitted after representing himself. Credit: PA
Bronson was acquitted after representing himself. Credit: PA

Bronson represented himself at the trial at Leeds Crown Court, where he was acquitted of trying to gouge Wakefield Prison governor Mark Docherty's eyes out. Bronson danced a celebratory jig after the verdict was announced before describing British justice as the 'best in the world'.

The trial was unorthodox from start to finish - as you might expect with Bronson representing himself.

Advert

On the first day, he began by insulting one of the jurors about his weight. Presiding over the case, Judge Tom Bayliss QC asked Bronson whether he had any objections to the three jurors who raised their hands when asked whether they had any connections to the prison service.

Bronson said he didn't have any problems, adding: "The big fat one there, I'll have him."

The judge replied: "Insulting the jurors at this stage is not a good plan."

But he wasn't finished, adding: "The one who has been eating all the pies, I'll have him."

Advert

Despite this shaky start, jurors found Bronson not guilty of attempting to cause grievous bodily harm with intent after deliberating for less than three hours; the judge even praised him too.

He said: "If I can compliment Mr Salvador he asked pretty good questions. As I say, I stopped him when he was going off the point, but I didn't have to stop him too much."

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: uk news, crime, CHarles Bronson

Jake Massey

Jake Massey is a journalist at LADbible. He graduated from Newcastle University, where he learnt a bit about media and a lot about living without heating. After spending a few years in Australia and New Zealand, Jake secured a role at an obscure radio station in Norwich, inadvertently becoming a real-life Alan Partridge in the process. From there, Jake became a reporter at the Eastern Daily Press. Jake enjoys playing football, listening to music and writing about himself in the third person.