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Pubs And Venues May Turn Away Those Without Covid Vaccine Proof, Minister Says

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Pubs And Venues May Turn Away Those Without Covid Vaccine Proof, Minister Says

Those who refuse to have a Covid-19 vaccine could be turned away from pubs and restaurants, a minister has said.

Nadhim Zahawi, who has been appointed as the minister responsible for the rollout of the vaccine, said that although it will not be compulsory to have the jab, businesses may need proof that customers have had it before allowing them in.

It means that visitors to hospitality venues and sports events could need to prove that they have been vaccinated.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA
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When asked by the BBC whether those who have had the jab would get an 'immunity passport', Zahawi said: "We are looking at the technology. And, of course, a way of people being able to inform their GP that they have been vaccinated.

"But, also, I think you'll probably find that restaurants and bars and cinemas and other venues, sports venues, will probably also use that system - as they have done with the [test and trace] app.

"I think that in many ways the pressure will come from both ways. From service providers who'll say: 'Look, demonstrate to us that you have been vaccinated.'

"But, also, we will make the technology as easy and accessible as possible."

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Nadhim Zahawi is overseeing the rollout of the vaccine. Credit: PA
Nadhim Zahawi is overseeing the rollout of the vaccine. Credit: PA

Health secretary Matt Hancock told a Downing Street press conference: "For a long time now we've been looking at the questions that minister Zahawi was talking about and the question of what's the impact on the individual in terms of what they can do.

"Firstly, we do not plan to mandate the vaccine. We think that by encouraging the uptake of the vaccine, we will get a very high proportion of people in this country to take up the vaccine, because of course it protects you but it also helps to protect your loved ones and your community."

Meanwhile, an 'immunity passport' could also be necessary to travel, with the CEO of airline Qantas already confirming that people wishing to fly will need to prove they have had the vaccine, once it is available.

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The Australian airline boss Alan Joyce also reckons that proof of vaccination will be a general requirement of many airlines as things start to return to something like normal after the pandemic.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

Joyce has previously stated that air travel won't resume fully until there is a safe vaccine available for staff and travellers, but went beyond that to say that it will become a necessity for those who wish to travel.

Speaking on A Current Affair, Joyce said: "We are looking at changing our terms and conditions to say that, for international travellers, we will ask people to have a vaccination before they get on the aircraft.

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"Whether you need that domestically, we will have to see with Covid-19 and the market but certainly, for international visitors coming out [of Australia] and people leaving the country we think that's a necessity."

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: vaccine, Covid-19

Amelia Ward
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